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All Swap Info for EF

Discussion in 'HYBRID -> ED-EF / DA' started by Riceras, Feb 7, 2005.

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  1. Riceras

    Riceras Senior Member

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    EF Swap guide. By Ben Ogle Ogle6@hotmail.com

    So you have an EF/ED. Chances are that it is slow as fuck, especially if you ended up with a DX, LX, STD or some other long-geared, gas-saving, dual point model. So this guide is here to help you decide how you want to make faster without the aid of forced induction (well, you can go that route too but its not covered). If you are a newbie read EVERYTHING here. That way you will spend less time asking questions on message boards. Also, I didn’t feel like reiterating everything in every specific motor section so read at least the first few before you scroll down to the motor you want to get.

    B-series.
    These are by far the most popular swaps. They are fairly easy for the average joe to do and are pretty fast right out of the box (errr…clip). But in doing a b-series swap you WILL need to do some things in order for this swap to work:
    -Get some mounts. I like Hasports as do many others but Place Racing, HCP, and some others make them as well. NOTE: the B16 JRSC fits with Place Racing mounts in the EF chassis. I have done it. I don’t know about the other mount kits. If you know, please tell me.
    -You have to either find EF SiR shift linkage or you can shorten 90-93 integra shift linkage by 2-3/8†. I do the latter because DA linkage is easy to find and its cheap. I also always shorten it in the straightest portion possible. The 3rd option is to get some adjustable shift linkage From Hasport or Place Racing.
    -You need (maybe not NEED) a tranny that has a Cable actuated clutch. This will be covered on a case by case basis in the motor portion of this guide.
    -If you have a Dual-Point car you will NEED to convert it to Multi-Point. If you are going the VTEC route you will need to wire the VTEC stuff in all EFs no matter the trim level.
    -MPFI wiring: http://tech.hybridgarage.com/tech/4gtech/dx-zc-wiring.htm
    -VTEC wiring; wires to add if using PR3/PW0:
    o Pin A8 – VTEC solenoid.
    o Pin B5 – VTEC oil pressure switch (plug with 2 wires, Black is ground)
    o Pin B19 – Knock sensor.
    o Pin C8 – Second oxygen sensor
    -Get some 90-93 integra axles, JDM EF SiR axles (good luck finding them if they didn’t come with your swap) or get custom ones. You need to have a 90-93 teg intermediate shaft with the teg axles and an SiR int shaft with the SiR axles. If you get customs ones ask the manufacturer of the axles which intermediate shaft you should use.
    -If using 90-93 axles, take out the dust rings on your knuckles. Also take off the dust rings on the axles. It sucks but you pretty much need the clearance for the axles. Try to stay out of the dirt.
    -You need a 90-93 integra throttle cable (except if you are going JRSC, then you can use the stock one).
    -You need to make a large dent in the frame rail right below the shock tower (right under the rectangular hole). This dent clears the alternator pulley. NOTE: if you’re putting a JRSC in this dent will NEED to be further forward and a lot deeper. Trust me. Experience talking. We pulled the motor a few times messing with this.
    -Your stock exhaust probably wont bolt up (if it does you are lucky). If you are using a stock exhaust manifold on the b-series then you can use you stock D-series down pipe on the b-series manifold. But what you really should do is get rid of the stock manifold, buy a header, and get some 2.25†exhaust made at a muffler shop. Or you could buy an aftermarket cat-back exhaust and get it modified to fit. Either way you WILL want to get rid of that 1.5†crush bent stock crap and the stock header/downpipe.

    ECU pin outs are here: http://www.g2ic.com/tegtips/engine/ECU_Pin_Outs.xls
    I know this sounds like a lot of stuff but it really isn’t when you get down to it.

    D-series.
    Your car comes stock with a d-series engine. These bolt right in with out mount kits. You can use your stock shift linkage, axles, mounts, and even the tranny if you want (you’ll want to find an Si one).

    H-series.
    You are on your own. Few people have done it and IMO its not worth the effort unless its going into an 88 CRX Hf (1819lbs stock) and even then it would be a huge pain. If you want an H-series buy an early low-model EG hatch. Your time will be better spent and the cars aren’t all that much heavier than a low model EF. If you are learning a lot by what you are reading right now this is NOT the swap for you.

    On with the engines.

    B-series VTEC motors:

    Engine: 1988-1991 JDM B16A
    Displacement: 1595cc
    Compression Ratio: 10.2:1
    Rod/stroke ratio: 1.74
    Hp/Torque: 160hp@7600rpm/112lb-ft@7000rpm
    Transmission: JDM S1, J1, Y1, A1 (cable)
    OBD: 0
    ECU: integra motor - PR3, civic motor - PW0. But the motor can be run with a PR4 and an RPM switch or a PS9 with DaveB’s wonderful one-wire VTEC chip (PM6’s can be converted too).

    This is one of the easiest B-series swaps to do (and the most common). You can get full swaps for $1200-1600 depending on where you get it from and if you get any special stuff with it (like, for instance the LSD tranny which is a GREAT thing to get). If you can, try to get a motor from an EF SiR. That way you get the axles and shift linkage that were made for your car. It goes in like butta. But if you get an integra motor those are ok too. The shift linkage will need to be shortened and the axles will work. The car will need to be wired for only VTEC if you have an Si, Hf, or EX. If you have an LX, DX, STD or another dual point car I forgot then the car will have to be wired for multipoint as well.

    For Multipoint wiring go here: http://tech.hybridgarage.com/tech/4gtech/dx-zc-wiring.htm I printed that out and have used it every time I wired a DPFI car. Its invaluable. For VTEC wiring I just make my own harness from other harnesses I have laying around (or from the one that came with the swap). I run a plug from the ECU to the passenger side plug holder (there is already a spot for it!) and then run the other side of the plug to all the VTEC sensors.

    With the motor, the tranny supplied is great. The only problem with b16 trannies is the 3rd gear grinds. They are tough to find without.

    Stock B16 EF’s typically run high 14s to low 15s down the drag strip. Pretty damn good for a 1.6 liter.

    Engine: 1992-up JDM B16A
    Displacement: 1595cc
    Compression Ratio: 10.4:1
    Rod/stroke ratio: 1.74
    Hp/Torque: 170hp@7800rpm/116lb-ft@7300
    Transmission: Y21, S4C (hydraulic)
    OBD: 1
    ECU: P30

    This is the same motor as above but out of a 92-95 civic SIR (with higher compression), so the motor will be, of course, newer. These go for $1500-$2000. The problems are with the OBD1 and the hydraulic clutch trannies and because of these problems they really aren’t a great choice for our generation civics.

    The OBD problem:
    Your car is OBD0 and this motor is OBD1. Almost all of the wiring is different. So you can convert the motor to obd0 by installing a 1g b16 distributor, getting an OBD0 VTEC ECU, and getting a whole bunch of OBD0 sensors (or putting OBD1 plugs on your OBD0 harness). You can utilize the OBD 1 injectors if you don’t use an injector resistor box.

    The other option is to convert your whole car to OBD1. There is a lot of work involved. Heres a link: http://www.geocities.com/kurtsi_on/page7.html

    The tranny problem:
    Your car uses a Cable actuated clutch. The tranny is meant to go in a car with a hydraulic actuated clutch. There are kits available to use the hydro trannies in cable cars. I’m pretty sure the Hasport one is out now so you can check out their site www.hasport.com .

    The easier path is to sell the hydro tranny (which go for quite a bit more than cable trannies) and buy a B16 cable tranny. Expect to pay around $300 for a non LSD one and about $600 if you can find an LSD one.

    Engine: 1993-1995 USDM B16A2/3
    Displacement: 1595cc
    Compression Ratio: 10.2:1
    Rod/stroke ratio: 1.74
    Hp/Torque: 160hp@7600rpm/112lb-ft@7000
    Transmission: Y21 (hydraulic)
    OBD: 1
    ECU: P30

    This motor came out of the 94-95 Del Sol VTECs and is the same as above but with lower compression and weaker fuel/ignition maps in the ECU.

    Engine: 1996-1997 & 1999-2000 USDM B16A
    Displacement: 1595cc
    Compression Ratio: 10.2:1
    Rod/stroke ratio: 1.74
    Hp/Torque: 160hp@7600rpm/112lb-ft@7000
    Transmission: S4C (hydraulic)
    OBD: 2
    ECU: 99-00 – P2T

    The 96-97 motors came out of DelSol VTECs, and the 99-00 motors came from Civic Si’s. These are going to be expensive if you can find one. The same stuff from the OBD1 motor applies.

    The OBD problem:
    Your car is OBD0 (or non-OBD if you are anal) and this motor is OBD2. All of the wiring is different. You can convert the motor to obd0 by installing a 1g b16 distributor, getting an OBD0 VTEC ECU, and getting a whole bunch of OBD0 sensors (or putting OBD2 plugs on your OBD0 harness). You can use the OBD 2 injectors if you don’t use an injector resistor box.

    You’re not going to want to convert the car to OBD2. If you really want to convert the car to a different OBD, go to OBD1. Then you will still have to convert the motor to OBD 1 but that’s not as hard as going from OBD1 – 0 or OBD 2 - 0.

    The tranny problem:
    Your car uses a Cable actuated clutch. The tranny is meant to go in a car with a hydraulic actuated clutch. There are kits available to use the hydro trannies in cable cars. I’m pretty sure the Hasport one is out now so you can check out their site www.hasport.com .

    The easier path is to sell the hydro tranny (which go for quite a bit more than cable trannies) and buy a B16 cable tranny. Expect to pay around $300 for a non LSD one and about $600 if you can find an LSD one.

    Engine: 1992-1993 USDM B17A1
    Displacement: 1678cc
    Compression Ratio: 9.7:1
    Rod/stroke ratio: 1.68
    Hp/Torque: 160hp@7600rpm/117lb-ft@7000
    Transmission: YS1 (short geared cable)
    OBD: 1
    ECU: P61 (pretty much a P30)

    This motor came ONLY in 92-93 integra GS-R’s. It is essentially a stroked B16 with low compression. The B17 and B16 blocks are the same in all aspects except the block stamp. The difference is in the crank, rods, and pistons (lower comp). The b17 cams are also better than the 88-97 b16 cams. These are great motors but are a tad hard to find and the price varies a ton. If you can, try and get one with a stock GS-R tranny. It is one of the shortest geared ones out there and it’s a cable tranny(!). Unfortunately they only came in OBD1 so again you have some choices

    The OBD problem:
    Your car is OBD0 and this motor is OBD1. Almost all of the wiring is different. So you can convert the motor to obd0 by installing a 1g b16 distributor, getting an OBD0 VTEC ECU, and getting a whole bunch of OBD0 sensors (or putting OBD1 plugs on your OBD0 harness). You can utilize the OBD 1 injectors if you don’t use an injector resistor box. If you get a PW0 or PR3 I would suggest getting it chipped for the displacement increased. This is of course not as good as dyno tuning but it helps.

    The other option is to convert your whole car to OBD1. There is a lot of work involved. Here’s a link: http://www.geocities.com/kurtsi_on/page7.html

    Engine: 1994-1995 USDM B18C1
    Displacement: 1797cc
    Compression Ratio: 10.0:1
    Rod/stroke ratio: 1.58
    Hp/Torque: 170hp@7600rpm/128lb-ft@6200
    Transmission: Y80 (hydraulic)
    OBD: 1
    ECU: P72

    This motor is out of a 94-95 GS-R. It does not share too many components with the B16. It has, among other things, a different head (p72 as opposed to pr3), more aggressive cams, and a taller block. It also has a “Dual Runner†intake manifold. But like most the others this motor is OBD1 and hydro tranny equipped. Expect to pay around $3200 for the whole swap.

    The OBD problem:
    Your car is OBD0 (or non-OBD if you are anal) and this motor is OBD1. Almost all of the wiring is different. So you can convert the motor to obd0 by installing a 1g b16 distributor, getting an OBD0 VTEC ECU, and getting a whole bunch of OBD0 sensors (or putting OBD1 plugs on your OBD0 harness). If you go this route you will have to get rid of the dual runner intake manifold by buying a skunk2 manifold. The OBD0 VTEC ECUs don’t support the dual runners. Again, you can utilize the OBD 1 injectors if you don’t use an injector resistor box. If you get a PW0 or PR3 I would suggest getting it chipped for the displacement increased. This is of course not as good as dyno tuning but it helps.

    The other option is to convert your whole car to OBD1. There is a lot of work involved. Heres a link: http://www.geocities.com/kurtsi_on/page7.html

    The tranny problem:
    Your car uses a Cable actuated clutch. The tranny is meant to go in a car with a hydraulic actuated clutch. There are kits available to use the hydro trannies in cable cars. I’m pretty sure the Hasport one is out now so you can check out their site www.hasport.com .

    The easier path is to sell the hydro tranny (which go for quite a bit more than cable trannies) and buy a B16 cable tranny. Expect to pay around $300 for a non LSD one and about $600 if you can find an LSD one.

    Engine: 1996-up USDM B18C1
    Displacement: 1797cc
    Compression Ratio: 10.0:1
    Rod/stroke ratio: 1.58
    Hp/Torque: 170hp@7600rpm/128lb-ft@6200
    Transmission: Y80 (hydraulic)
    OBD: 2
    ECU: P72

    This is the OBD2 version of the above motor and it came in 96-01 GS-R’s. Other than the wiring it is the same as above. Expect to pay around $3000-$4000 for the whole swap.

    The OBD problem:
    Your car is OBD0 and this motor is OBD2. All of the wiring is different. You can convert the motor to obd0 by installing a 1g b16 distributor, getting an OBD0 VTEC ECU, and getting a whole bunch of OBD0 sensors (or putting OBD2 plugs on your OBD0 harness). If you go this route you will have to get rid of the dual runner intake manifold by buying a skunk2 manifold. The OBD0 VTEC ECUs don’t support the dual runners. Again, you can utilize the OBD 2 injectors if you don’t use an injector resistor box. If you get a PW0 or PR3 I would suggest getting it chipped for the displacement increased. This is of course not as good as dyno tuning but it helps.

    You’re not going to want to convert the car to OBD2. If you really want to convert the car to a different OBD, go to OBD1. Then you will still have to convert the motor to OBD 1 but that’s not as hard as going from OBD1 – 0 or OBD 2 - 0.

    The tranny problem:
    Your car uses a Cable actuated clutch. The tranny is meant to go in a car with a hydraulic actuated clutch. There are kits available to use the hydro trannies in cable cars. Hasport now makes a mount kit with hydro-cable conversion pieces and the special hydro tranny mount. Check out their site www.hasport.com .

    The other path is to sell the hydro tranny (which go for quite a bit more than cable trannies) and buy a B16 cable tranny. Expect to pay around $300 for a non LSD one and about $600 if you can find an LSD one.

    Engine: 1996-up JDM B18C
    Displacement: 1797cc
    Compression Ratio: 10.6:1
    Rod/stroke ratio: 1.58
    Hp/Torque: 180hp@7600rpm/129lb-ft@6200
    Transmission: Y80, S80 (hydraulic/optional LSD)
    OBD: 2
    ECU: P72

    Same motor as the 96+ USDM motor but with higher compression and an optional LSD tranny. These motors are probably easier to find than the USDM motors because you can get them from one of the many engine importers. Expect to pay around $3200 for the whole swap. Other than that see the USDM 96+ B18C listing above.

    Engine: 1997-up JDM B16B
    Displacement: 1595cc
    Compression Ratio: 10.8:1
    Rod/stroke ratio: 1.77
    Hp/Torque: 185hp@8200rpm/118lb-ft@7500
    Transmission: S80 w/ LSD (hydraulic)
    OBD: 2
    ECU: PCT

    The B16B is a one of a kind Honda 1.6liter. It came from the JDM Civic Type R and shares a block with the Integra Type R B18C5 but has a shorter stoke and longer rods giving it that rev-happy 1.77 rod stroke ratio (highest of all the B-series motors). B16B’s also have more aggressive cams than even the B18C5/R motors. These motors are fairly rare and very rarely swapped into anything. This is probably because they go for around $3800 (whole swap). That’s $600 more than the JDM B18C1 which has only 5hp less and 10lb-ft more torque (at lower RPM, too).

    The OBD problem:
    This motor is OBD2. All of the wiring is different. You can convert the motor to obd0 by installing a 1g b16 distributor (OBD0 B18a dist will work with modification), getting an OBD0 VTEC ECU, and getting a whole bunch of OBD0 sensors (or putting OBD2 plugs on your OBD0 harness). You can utilize the OBD 2 injectors if you don’t use an injector resistor box.

    You’re not going to want to convert the car to OBD2. If you really want to convert the car to a different OBD, go to OBD1. Then you will still have to convert the motor to OBD 1 but that’s not as hard as going from OBD1 – 0 or OBD 2 - 0.

    The tranny problem:
    Your car uses a Cable actuated clutch. The tranny is meant to go in a car with a hydraulic actuated clutch. There are kits available to use the hydro trannies in cable cars. Hasport now makes a mount kit with hydro-cable conversion pieces and the special hydro tranny mount. Check out their site www.hasport.com .

    The other path is to sell the hydro tranny (which go for quite a bit more than cable trannies) and buy a B16 cable tranny. Expect to pay around $300 for a non LSD one and about $600 if you can find an LSD one.

    Engine: 1997-up USDM B18C5
    Displacement: 1797cc
    Compression Ratio: 10.6:1
    Rod/stroke ratio: 1.58
    Hp/Torque: 195hp@8000rpm/130lb-ft@7500rpm
    Transmission: S80 w/ LSD (hydraulic)
    OBD: 2
    ECU: P73

    Out of 97+ Integra Type Rs this motor is Honda’s king-dingaling 1.8 liter. It features larger cams/better valve train than the B18C1, factory polished PR3 Head (different than the B18C1’s P72), short/fat single runner intake manifold, 14lb flywheel (4 lbs lighter than all the other B-series motors), and a very short geared LSD tranny. These swaps typically run $4300-$4700 depending on where you get it.

    The OBD problem:
    This motor is OBD2. All of the wiring is different. You can convert the motor to obd0 by installing a 1g b16 distributor (OBD0 B18a dist will work with modification), getting an OBD0 VTEC ECU, and getting a whole bunch of OBD0 sensors (or putting OBD2 plugs on your OBD0 harness). You can utilize the OBD 2 injectors if you don’t use an injector resistor box. These injectors are no bigger than normal b-series injectors.

    You’re probably not going to want to convert the car to OBD2. If you really want to convert the car to a different OBD, go to OBD1. Then you will still have to convert the motor to OBD 1 but that’s not as hard as going from OBD1 – 0 or OBD 2 - 0. This motor does, however, run very well on its native OBD2.

    The tranny problem:
    Your car uses a Cable actuated clutch. The tranny is meant to go in a car with a hydraulic actuated clutch. However, there are kits available to use the hydro trannies in cable cars. Hasport now makes a mount kit with hydro-cable conversion pieces and the special hydro tranny mount (get it; ITR trannies are the best stock b-series tranny). Check out their site www.hasport.com .

    The other path is to sell the hydro tranny (ITR trannies go for a LOT) and buy a B16 cable tranny. Expect to pay around $300 for a non LSD one and about $600 if you can find an LSD one (get an LSD one at the very least).

    Engine: 1995-up JDM B18C-R
    Displacement: 1797cc
    Compression Ratio: 11.0:1
    Rod/stroke ratio: 1.58
    Hp/Torque: 200hp@8000rpm/135lb-ft@7500rpm
    Transmission: S80 w/ LSD (hydraulic)
    OBD: 2
    ECU: P73

    This motor is the same as the USDM B18C5 but with higher compression. See above.

    Engine: Poorman’s Type R
    Displacement: 1797cc
    Compression Ratio: ?
    Rod/stroke ratio: 1.58
    Hp/Torque: ?
    Transmission: ?
    OBD: ?
    ECU: ?

    This motor is a B18C1 block (94+ GSR) with a b16 head. Some people buy B16 swaps, drive them for a while then swap the B16 block out for a B18C1 one. This is a pretty good alternative to the B18C in EFs because you can get an LSD equipped B16 for $1400 then a B18c block for around $700-$1k and then you already have all the OBD0 stuff. Also, this motor gives you the ability to build/rebuild the block slowly while still driving your swapped car. Unfortunately B18C short blocks are hard to find and go quick when you do find them.

    It is recommended to get some higher compression pistons and a better valve train/cams. Might as well, right?

    Engine: LS/VTEC CR/VTEC
    Displacement: 1834cc - 1973cc and up
    Compression Ratio: ?
    Rod/stroke ratio: 1.54 (this stays the same)
    Hp/Torque: ?
    Transmission: ?
    OBD: ?
    ECU: ?

    In these you essentially take a non-vtec block like the b18a/b or the b20b/z and put a VTEC head on. The idea is to take the low end torque of the non-vtec motors and combine it with the high rpm power of the VTEC motors. People do it and succeed in making a lot of power but a lot of people do it and just end up with a blown motor. These motors range from “stock†LS/VTECs where someone slaps a stock head on a stock non-vtec block (this is dumb), to fully built monsters.

    The main reason a lot of people don’t like them (me included) is because of the low rod/stroke ratios inherent in the non-vtec blocks. This low r/s ratio stresses the bottom end a bunch. If you’ll notice, Honda reduced the stroke from the B18A/B to the B18C. Now if the B18C is supposed to be a more performance oriented motor why didn’t they keep the displacement? For the better r/s ratio.

    Another reason is that the non-vtec blocks don’t come with some of the features that the VTEC blocks. These include oil squirters, block girdles (on the B18C’s), and a very balanced bottom end.

    The upside to this is that they have the potential to make a large amount of power. Its up to you. I am not going to say anymore because there are SOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO many threads on message boards all over the internet.

    For info: Search on www.honda-tech.com or www.g2ic.com or one of the many others.
    Links:
    http://www.g2ic.com/forums/showthread.php?s=&threadid=69114
    http://www.lsvtec.org/
    http://www.g2ic.com/tegtips/engine/6.html
    http://www.indysol.com/resource/lsvtec.html

    B-Series NON-VTEC motors:

    Engine: 1990-1991 USDM B18A1
    Displacement: 1834cc
    Compression Ratio: 9.2:1
    Rod/stroke ratio: 1.54
    Hp/Torque: 130hp@6000rpm/121lb-ft@5000rpm
    Transmission: S1, Y1, YS1, A1 (91 only) (cable)
    OBD: 0
    ECU: PR4

    The B18A1 is out of 90-91 integras. This is one of the easiest swaps out there especially if you have an Si, Hf, or an EX. If you don’t, then you need to wire for multi-point. That’s it.

    These motors are readily available as well. People often swap motors into their 90-91 integras so they have these pretty-much-complete swaps just laying around. You cant find them at engine importers but quite a few people sell them on www.g2ic.com and you could probably find a few at junkyards. I picked up a whole swap minus wiring harness and axles for $500. Cant beat that with a stick, eh? The downside to this is mileage on the motors and the fact that some people swap motors in their integras because the stock B18A is going out the door.

    Performance is good. I had a B18a in my civic for a few months and it was a good motor. Great for daily driving and just enough torque for the tight autocrosses we occasionally have. I took it to the drag strip once and netted a 15.1 @ 91mph in two runs at 2240ft above sea level.

    Engine: 1992-1993 USDM B18A1
    Displacement: 1834cc
    Compression Ratio: 9.2:1
    Rod/stroke ratio: 1.54
    Hp/Torque: 140hp@6300rpm/121lb-ft@5200rpm
    Transmission: USDM YS1 (cable)
    OBD: 1
    ECU: OBD1 PR4

    This B18A1 is out of 92-93 non-GSR integras. It is the same motor as the 90-91 B18A but with slightly larger cams and a (supposedly) better flowing intake manifold. These usually go for a few bucks more than the 90-91 motors.

    This motor is OBD1 so you will have to either rewire your car or convert the motor to OBD0. I would suggest converting the motor. Its pretty cheap and very easy to do. You will need a 90-91 B18a distributor and ECU. For the injectors you have to wire them without an injector resistor box. And the only plug from the OBD1 harness you cant use with ease is going to be the distributor plug. So you will need to find one and may have to buy an entire engine harness (I get them for $35 at the junkyard, not a big deal). Or you could use the OBD1/2 plugs and put them on your OBD0 dist. That’s all. Cake.

    Engine: 1994-Up USDM B18B1
    Displacement: 1834cc
    Compression Ratio: 9.2:1
    Rod/stroke ratio: 1.54
    Hp/Torque: 142hp@6300rpm/127lb-ft@5200rpm
    Transmission: USDM S80 (hydraulic, long gears)
    OBD: 1 or 2
    ECU: P75

    The B18B1 comes from 94+ non-GSR integras. This motor differs from the 92-93 motor in that it has a different head casting (P75 as opposed to PR4), ever so slightly larger cams, a (again, supposedly) better flowing intake manifold, and a little more aggressive ECU tuning. The motors are also obviously newer than any of the other non-VTEC B18s and are most likely in better shape.

    For 94-95 this motor was OBD1 and for 96+ it was OBD2. Either way it is easy to convert them to OBD0 by getting a 90-91 B18a distributor and ECU. For the injectors you have to wire them without an injector resistor box. And the only plug from the OBD1 harness you cant use with ease is going to be the distributor plug. So you will need to find one and may have to buy an entire engine harness (I get them for $35 at the junkyard, not a big deal). Or you could use the OBD1/2 plugs and put them on your OBD0 dist. Its up to you.

    Engine: 1996-1998 USDM B20B
    Displacement: 1973cc
    Compression Ratio: 8.8:1
    Rod/stroke ratio: 1.54
    Hp/Torque: 126hp@5400rpm/133lb-ft@4300rpm
    Transmission: ?
    OBD: 2
    ECU: Don’t know/care. You wont use it.

    These are from 97-98 CRV’s. Don’t be fooled by the low hp/tq rating, these motors came with the crappiest intake manifolds and exhaust manifolds known to man. If you do this swap you wont use either as the intake manifold wont fit in your car (its called the giraffe for a reason) and you will get a different header (even a stock integra manifold is WAY better). The USDM B20B is essentially a B18B1 with 84mm sleves/pistons. Everything else is the same: head, cams, crank, rods, etc. So you can think of it as a bored, low compression B18a/b.

    For this motor you will want to get just a long block because the tranny, wiring, ECU, and even the intake and exhaust manifolds are not needed (some long blocks may come with them, though). Because of this it is wise to get a whole B18A swap and sell the B18. That way you wont have to search around for a whole bunch of parts that you didn’t anticipate needing. Trust me.

    Intake manifold: You can use them from any non-vtec B18, a B20Z, or you can buy a skunk2 mani. I would suggest a B18B or skunk2 one. The skunk2 IM because it is supposedly the “mod to get†for the B20s, and the B18B IM because it is the best flowing of the B18 bunch. If you get a B18 or B20 IM then try and get it complete (fuel rail, injectors, TB and the like). I will cover the B20Z IM in the B20Z section.

    Exhaust manifold: Get a header. If you want to be cheap you can use a stock integra one.

    Tranny: Any B-series cable tranny will work. If you really want to use a hydro tranny or have one laying around get Hasport’s mount kit for hydro trannies.

    Wiring: You will have to convert the motor to OBD0. You do this by getting a 90-91 B18a distributor and ECU and putting them in your car. For the injectors you have to wire them without an injector resistor box. And the only plug from the OBD1 harness you cant use with ease is going to be the distributor plug. So you will need to find one and may have to buy an entire engine harness (I get them for $35 at the junkyard, not a big deal). Or you could use the OBD1/2 plugs and put them on your OBD0 dist. Its up to you.

    Engine: 1999-2000 USDM B20Z
    Displacement: 1973cc
    Compression Ratio: 9.6:1
    Rod/stroke ratio: 1.54
    Hp/Torque: 146hp@6200rpm/133lb-ft@4500rpm
    Transmission: ?
    OBD: 2
    ECU: Don’t know/care. You wont use it.

    This is the high compression version of the USDM B20B. It came out of 99-00 CRV’s and is the king of all the non-vtec B-series motors. It comes with an intake cam that is .3mm larger in lift, a shorter/better intake manifold, and of course higher compression.

    For this motor you will want to get just a long block because the tranny, wiring, ECU, and exhaust manifold is not needed. Because of this it is wise to get a whole B18A swap and sell the B18. That way you wont have to search around for a whole bunch of parts that you didn’t anticipate needing. Trust me.

    Intake manifold: With this motor you can use the stock one. But you cannot use the chamber on top because it doesn’t clear the hood (I’ve tried it). Without that chamber there is a big gaping hole in the top of the IM and you, quite obviously, don’t want that. What I did was make a plug out of UHMW plastic on the lathe to the same size as the chamber inlet and then put the chamber inlet rubber seal on my plug. It works well and I haven’t had any vacuum leaks.

    If you want to use the B20z throttle body (its 60mm as opposed to the 90-93 TB which is 58mm) then you either have to use the stock throttle cable bracket and mounting position (its straight up and down, it sucks). The better alternative (IMO) is to make a bracket that bolts onto the unused threaded holes that look to be in the same location as the throttle cable bracket on B18 IM’s. The holes aren’t in the same position and that is why you need to make a bracket. My bracket is out of 1/8†steel. It bolts to those holes and a stock B18 bracket bolts to my bracket. If you go this route you will need to use a throttle plate pulley (the throttle cable pulls on this to open the throttle) from a 90-93 integra.

    If you want to use the stock CRV injectors you can. But I didn’t know the size of them and they were significantly physically smaller than my B18 injectors, so I used the B18 ones. These are taller than the B20 injectors. To make them fit I put one B18A (d16a6 ones will work too) fuel rail spacer under each of the 3 fuel rail studs on the B20 mani (between the stud and the IM, they do not fit between the rail and the stud). I had to put a drill through the all of the spacer’s holes so they would fit over the stud’s threads.

    If you insist on not using the stock IM you can use one from any non-vtec B18 or you can buy a skunk2 mani. If you are going to use a B18 one and you don’t already have one, get the B18B IM because it is the best flowing of the b18 bunch. If you get a B18 IM try and get it complete (fuel rail, injectors, TB and the like).

    Exhaust manifold: Get a header. If you want to be cheap you can use a stock integra one.

    Tranny: Any B-series cable tranny will work. If you really want to use a hydro tranny or have one laying around get hasport’s mount kit for hydro trannies.

    Wiring: You will have to convert the motor to OBD0. You do this by getting a 90-91 B18a distributor and ECU and putting them in your car. For the injectors you have to wire them without an injector resistor box. And the only plug from the OBD1 harness you cant use with ease is going to be the distributor plug. So you will need to find one and may have to buy an entire engine harness (I get them for $35 at the junkyard, not a big deal). Or you could use the OBD1/2 plugs and put them on your OBD0 dist. Its up to you.

    A comparison between the B20B and Z with dyno charts exists and is at http://hybrid2.honda-perf.org/tech/b20/b20dyno.html

    I have this motor in my car now and it rules. It is happy going fast anywhere above 3k and putts around town with no problem at 1500-3k. It also kicks major ass at auto-x events. The power is great, even for the long auto-x events we often have on the road course (80+ mph straights). I went to the drag strip and pulled a 14.42@95 on my first of 3 runs at 2240ft on a 100deg F day. I must say that this motor is WAY more fun than the B18A ever was. Oh yeah, and I’m getting 34 miles to the gallon on a chipped ECU when I drive sane.

    Engine: 1995 or so-2000 JDM B20B
    Displacement: 1973cc
    Compression Ratio: 8.8:1, 9.2:1, 9.6:1
    Rod/stroke ratio: 1.54
    Hp/Torque: up to146hp@6200rpm/133lb-ft@4500rpm
    Transmission: ?
    OBD: 2
    ECU: Don’t know/care. You wont use it.

    These motors are a mixed bag. Who knows what you’re going to get when you buy your long block from an importer. There is no real concrete information available that accurately maps out which motor came from which years/cars. So I will attempt you tell you and at the very least tell you how to identify your motor (hopefully without taking the head off).

    In general the 95 – 98 motors are the 8.8:1 compression motors and are exactly like the USDM B20B. They have the tall intake manifold and no knock sensor on the back of the block. If there is no knock sensor then you have an 8.8:1 compression motor. If you want to take off the head you will find the letters P3F on the top of the slightly dished piston.

    Most of the 99-2000 motors are of the 9.6:1 compression variety and are just like the USDM B20Z. These motors have the short intake manifold with the chamber on top and a knock sensor. If you have a knock sensor on the back of the block, the motor is most likely has 9.6:1 compression. The pistons are almost flat and have a PHK designation.

    I have read that the 9.2:1 motors exist but I have seen no proof. I don’t know what they are out of or what the identifying marks are. My guess is that if you get one it will be mistaken for a 9.6:1 motor. If you have any info on this please let me know.

    If you got a motor with the tall manifold see the USDM B20B section. If yours came with a short manifold see the USDM B20Z section.

    Expect to pay $700-$800 for a long block.

    Engine: Up to 1991 USDM B20A/B21A
    Displacement: 1958cc or 2056cc
    Compression Ratio: 9.0:1 or 9.4:1
    Rod/stroke ratio: lower than 1.54
    Hp/Torque: 104hp@5800rpm/111lb-ft@4000rpm to140hp@5800rpm/135lb-ft@5000rpm
    Transmission: ?
    OBD: 0
    ECU: Don’t know/care.

    These came from 88-91 preludes (maybe others too). These engines are not worth swapping into your civic. Don’t be fooled by the price of them. They are regarded as the worst of all the Honda engines and aren’t even included in b20 discussions. They get their displacement increase by a very long stroke (95mm as opposed to the B18A’s already long 89mm). This means that they have to use short rods. That means a low rod/stroke ratio which puts a lot of stress on the bottom end components (cyl walls, rods, etc.).


    D-Series: Some general D16 info here >> http://www.honda-tech.com/zerothread?id=385741

    Engine: 1988 to 1991 USDM D16A6
    Displacement: 1590cc
    Compression Ratio: 9.1:1
    Rod/stroke ratio: 1.52
    Hp/Torque: 108hp@6000rpm/100lb-ft@5000rpm
    Transmission: Si L3
    OBD: 0
    ECU: PM6 (PS9 if auto EX)

    This engine came in 88-91 CRX Si’s, 89-91 Civic Si’s, and 90-91 Civic EX’s. So if you are swapping this motor then you probably have a Dual-Point motor in there now. This swap is the easiest of all motor swaps into the EF chassis. Pull old motor out, wire for multi-point and slide the new motor in. Easy. The only extra part you need is a 90-93 integra or CRX/Civic Si throttle cable.

    These motors can be had for very cheap. A buddy of mine picked one up for $75 with 108K miles on it. We put it in an 88 four door DX and it ran high 15’s.

    Engine: 1986 to 1989 USDM D16A1/3
    Displacement: 1590cc
    Compression Ratio: 9.3:1 or 9.5:1
    Rod/stroke ratio: 1.52
    Hp/Torque: up to 118hp@6800rpm/103lb-ft@5700rpm
    Transmission: ?
    OBD: 0
    ECU: PG6

    These motors are out of 86-89 integras. They don’t fit in the EF chassis without mounts and no one makes mounts for them. I have also read that the tranny doesn’t bolt up to any other D-Series motors. Also the DOHC head does not fit on any of the other SOHC blocks. So don’t get one of these for your EF.

    Engine: Up to 1991 ZC
    Displacement: 1590cc
    Compression Ratio: 9.3:1 or 9.5:1
    Rod/stroke ratio: 1.52
    Hp/Torque: up to 129hp@6800rpm/108lb-ft@5700rpm
    Transmission: ?
    OBD: 0
    ECU: PM7

    These motors came from a whole bunch of different cars in Japan (3g civics/crxs, 4g civics/crxs, 5g civics, and 1 and 2g integras). They came in a few different variations: carbed & pgmfi, SOHC and DOHC. They also came in a few cars in Europe but the motor was called the D16A8/9 and came with a PM2 ECU. Here is a site for identifying the ZC: http://www.geocities.com/teampimports/zcfiles/wzc.htm If it is down here is the main part I wanted you to read:

    “The engine code will either state zc if it is a Japanese model or d16a8 if it is European model.
    The second gen dohc zc will have a black valve cover with the bolts on the sides, and the Honda h at the exhaust side of the cover. There is a oil to water cooler on the back of the block. Motor mounts are identical to an 88-91 civic or crx's.â€

    If you get the right one, these motors bolt in with no problems at all. The swap is just like the D16A6 swap. You need a 90-93 integra or CRX/Civic Si throttle cable, then you need to wire for multi-point. That’s all. These motors can be run with a variety of ECU’s including (but probably not limited to) the PG7, PM7, PM6, PM2 (I’ve never ever seen one, not even on the internet), and PR4 (OBD0). Expect to pay around $500 for a ZC long block (about the same as a 1g B16A long block, crazy eh?).

    If anyone has more ZC info please let me know.

    Engine: 1992 to 1995 USDM D16Z6
    Displacement: 1590cc
    Compression Ratio: 9.2:1
    Rod/stroke ratio: 1.52
    Hp/Torque: up to 125hp@6600rpm/106lb-ft@5200rpm
    Transmission: Something Hydraulic
    OBD: 1
    ECU: P28

    The SOHC VTEC D16Z6 came from 92-95 civic Si’s and EX’s. This is a fairly common swap because Z6’s can be had for fairly cheap. I have seen them go for as little as $200 and as much as $500 (tranny may or may not be included, but you don’t need it anyway). The only problems are with the hydro tranny (if you get it) and the OBD1.

    The hydro tranny isn’t of much use to us 4g swap folks because it is a large pain to make work. The best solution is to find an EF Si tranny and be done with it. Any D-series tranny will work, like say the ever so common DX tranny (wanna buy one? I have 3), but the Si tranny has a lower final drive (same gears) than the DX one. Shorter gears are your friend. Just stay away from the 4 speed at all costs.

    As far as the OBD goes you have 2 options. You can make it easy on yourself and stay OBD0 or you can convert the car to OBD1. If you stay OBD0 its going to be a little ghetto and there is no way around it. Going OBD1 at least has the potential to not be ghetto but some people still make it ghetto. Either way, take your time.

    For OBD0 you first off need a D16A6 distributor. No, you cant use your D15B2 dual-point one. The A6 dist fits on the head but you can only secure it with 2 of the 3 bolts. One lines right up and the other two don’t but fortunately one of those two is close enough to use. I suppose you could cut the mounting ears off and weld them on in the right location but that is a lot of work and I haven’t seen it done yet. Then you need a way to make VTEC work. There are a variety of ways to do this. MSD makes an RPM activated switch you can use (shift lights also contain one of these and I have seen people use them), you can get a VAFC, you can run a PR3 or PW0 ECU (have to add another o2 sensor or get the ECU chipped to remove BOTH o2 sensors), or you can find a PS9 ECU and get it chipped with a 1 wire vtec program (one of the best ways IMO). Here is a link to a Z6 swap writeup: http://www.geocities.com/chacofgs/swap.html

    If you go for the gusto and decide to convert everything to OBD1 then you will need to get a P28 ECU and then do a bunch of wiring. Here is a link to a really good write-up on the Z6 swap and OBD1 conversion: http://www.geocities.com/kurtsi_on/page7.html

    Engine: 1996 to 2000 USDM D16Y8
    Displacement: 1590cc
    Compression Ratio: 9.6:1
    Rod/stroke ratio: 1.52
    Hp/Torque: 127hp@6600rpm/107lb-ft@5500rpm
    Transmission: Something Hydraulic
    OBD: 2
    ECU: P2P

    This motor comes out of 96-2000 civic EXs. The block is essentially the same as the a6 and z6 blocks, but the head is a lot different. It has been said that the z6 head flows better than the y8 head at high rpm. This is due to the port shapes and sizes. There have been many threads on many message boards debating which one is better. Here is a link to one: http://pub143.ezboard.com/fhondadseriesfrm...tart=21&stop=34 . Also the y8 manifold has shorter, fatter runners and a larger plenum than any of the other d-series manifolds. It has been called the “ITR manifold for the D-series.â€

    If you are not going for all out power then the head difference doesn’t really matter. This motor has higher compression and a slightly larger cam than the Z6 and so even though the Z6 head is “better,†stock for stock they are about the same as far as moving your car. The Y8 head does have 1 advantage over the Z6 head for us EF OBD0 d00ds. The A6 distributor bolts right up with no modification so there is less ghettoness with this swap than with the z6. Other than the A6 dist you will need a way to activate VTEC which can be done a few different ways. MSD makes an RPM activated switch you can use (shift lights also contain one of these and I have seen people use them), you can get a VAFC, you can run a PR3 or PW0 ECU (have to add another o2 sensor or get the ECU chipped to remove BOTH o2 sensors), or you can find a PS9 ECU and get it chipped with a 1 wire vtec program (one of the best ways IMO).

    If you want to go OBD1 follow the link in the Z6 section. I have read that there are a few OBD1 distributors that bolt onto the y8 head (like the CX one) so that shouldn’t really be a problem.

    Then you need to get a D series cable tranny. The hydro tranny isn’t of much use to us EF swap folks because it is a pain to make work. The best solution is to find an EF Si tranny and be done with it. Any D-series tranny will work, like say the ever so common DX tranny (wanna buy one? I have 3), but the Si tranny has a lower final drive (same gears) than the DX one. Shorter gears are your friend. Just stay away from the 4 speed at all costs.

    Engine: mini-me
    Displacement: ~1493 - ~1590cc
    Compression Ratio: ?
    Rod/stroke ratio: 1.52 or 1.59
    Hp/Torque: ?
    Transmission: ?
    OBD: probably 0
    ECU: ?

    This motor is the “LS/VTEC†for the D family. You take a D15 or D16 block and put a Z6 or Y8 head on there. There is, however, a whole lot less risk in building these than there is with the LS/VTECs because of the price and because most of the d16s (the ones you would use) come with essentially the same block (and therefore the same or even HIGHER rod/stroke ratio). If you use a d16 you will end up with a r/s ratio of 1.52 if you use the D15 block you end up with a r/s ratio of 1.59.

    The usual, normal guy, good running mini-me consists of:
    D16 or D15 block
    Z6 head
    Y8 intake manifold
    B18A throttle body (2mm bigger than the Z6 and Y8 manis and 3mm larger than the A6 one)
    PM6 and RPM switch (PS9 1 wire vtec is made for the D vtec swaps and is sooooooooooo much better than any rpm switch)

    CR info (not calculated by me):
    d16a6 block, d16z6 head: 10.4:1 (Head has 34.6cc combustion chamber volume)
    d16a6 block, d16y8 head: 11.2:1 (Head has 32.8cc combustion chamber volume)
    d15b2 block, d16z6 head: 10.6:1 (Head has 34.6cc combustion chamber volume)

    Here are some mini-me links:
    http://crx.honda-perf.org/articles/z6swap/z6swap.html
    http://www.geocities.com/chipman_13/mini-me-parts.html
    http://www.geocities.com/c_rexboy/minime.html

    Z6 vs Y8 head comparo:
    http://pub143.ezboard.com/fhondadseriesfrm...tart=21&stop=34



    So there you have it. I have included all of the popular engine swap choices and hopefully this helps someone.

    Thanks a bunch to Dan Platt (G2guru on g2ic) for letting me use his engine headings and using some info from his G2 swap guide.

    If you find anything wrong with this let me know. If you want to add to it, let me know. So rub on your titties.

    Ben
  2. phunky.buddha

    phunky.buddha Admin with a big stick Admin

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    That same exact information is posted up on ef-honda.com. Next time, just post the link instead of copying it all out. We don't like it when people steal our content, and we should respect others' content just the same.
  3. phunky.buddha

    phunky.buddha Admin with a big stick Admin

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