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Another...hrmmmmm...thread.

Discussion in 'Members' Lounge' started by Airjockie, Jan 16, 2009.

  1. Airjockie

    Airjockie Watanabe Whore!!!

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    OK, I watch the science channel too much...and they had a thing on light speed a few weeks ago. And they stated that we can only see the light of the sun and galaxies that is 10's of billion's years ago. Now lets put this into perspective.. we see the light the suns emits 8 minutes later, we see the nearest galaxy that emitted light about a year ago...distance is a measurement of light. Light year...yada yada yada.

    so... if the faintest farthest away point of light that we can see with the Hubble, is estimated at 14 billion years ago, and that sets the age for the universe... BBC NEWS | Science/Nature | 'Oldest' star found in galaxy ..... But we know that the universe is older...because it just has to be...and that's all of what we can find so far.....and speculate....

    but if the big bang came from one central mass of something....because everything radiates outward, in all directions...and like we're in the middle somewhere...wouldn't that mean that we would see more stars and stuff on one side of the earth?


    Just something to make you think......^_^
     
  2. Briansol

    Briansol Admins Admin VIP

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    the earth spins around the sun and on its axis. we see 360 deg. of everything at various times of day and month
     
  3. phyregod

    phyregod !!YTINASNI

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    Also, we, as humans, cannot grasp the concept of "billions" of years. I hate it when some scientist says "these bones are 14 million years old!".. He doesn't have a fucking clue. What he has is a "sort of kind of guess based on an element" and he has nothing solid to compare it against. We are but a little iddy biddy spec of something that is so fucking vast we may never capture even a glimpse of its actual size or timeline.

    Its odd, but I like the visuals in "men in black". The galaxy on orion's belt.. then in the end when our own universe is but a marble being played with in a game by giant aliens.
     
  4. Briansol

    Briansol Admins Admin VIP

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    lol its called carbon dating
     
  5. phyregod

    phyregod !!YTINASNI

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    [​IMG]
     

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    Last edited: Jan 17, 2009
  6. MthaFuknGreen

    MthaFuknGreen Green on the scene.

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    agree completely.

    im still stuck on the whole creation thing.
    im rolling down an endless flight of stairs on that one..
     
  7. awptickes

    awptickes unimpressed by you VIP

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    Maybe it'd be more smart-assed if the picture worked.
     

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  8. MthaFuknGreen

    MthaFuknGreen Green on the scene.

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    it doesnt show anything for me.
     
  9. serrilion

    serrilion In my own little world! VIP

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    Meh Sience a was of reading + headace, I like bangbang and bombbombs better, like the big bang theroy, that rules... soon another plant will Hit earth and the theroy will start all over again :)
     
  10. sufikation

    sufikation Active Member

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    you now must email me all your posts before you post them so i can spell check and humanize it. thanks.
     
  11. MthaFuknGreen

    MthaFuknGreen Green on the scene.

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    drunk much?

    thatd be really appreciated!
    lol
     
  12. phyregod

    phyregod !!YTINASNI

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  13. serrilion

    serrilion In my own little world! VIP

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    quite... how about you? need a frew to make it threw the day or maybe 4 or 5?
     
  14. MthaFuknGreen

    MthaFuknGreen Green on the scene.

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    drunk posting is dangerous.
     
  15. serrilion

    serrilion In my own little world! VIP

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    Sometimes! Just dont stick ya dick in a light socket and turn it on. Mite become a diffrent color yo!:confused:
     
  16. Celerity

    Celerity Well-Known Member

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    lemme give ya a bit of badly needed truth here :

    It takes light approximately 6 minutes to get here from our sun. the closest star to us is Alpha Centauri / Bernard's Star / The north star. It takes 75 years for it's light to reach us. (75 light years) Our closest Galaxy, Andromeda, is so far away that it's light takes quite a few thousands of years to reach us. (You can google that one up)

    [
    I'll address this in two parts. First, you are right - we really can't grasp the idea of a "billion", nor or "billions of years". However, as B said, Carbon Dating has measured the specific halflife (in CD's case, carbon), which is constant, and can identify most earthly material's age. It's not a guess.

    Part two: The universe is infinitely large. Beyond the edge of our known universe, lies something else - even if that something is really nothing. Beyond the edge of that nothing, exists something else - even if it's plasma. Beyond that edge lies something else, even if it's cheese. For the universe to be infinitely large, it may also be infinitely small. I say "may" because there is perhaps a chance that we wound up on the small side of the universal scale - And we can see the starting point of an infinite ray. But infinity over time creates an interesting dilemma: As time goes on, any one point on an infinite Ray becomes less and less significantly, forever and ever - Amen. That means our position on that ray is "almost infinite" Which is the same as "Infinite" making our existence "almost infinitely insignificant" or taken to it's lower common denominator extreme: "We really don't exist, or at least our existence is so close to not existing that it shouldn't be ever considered to exist"

    These are two seperate measurements here. Measuring the farthest distance from Earth is one thing, you can find out how long it's light took to reach us. That means that Hubble "looks backwards in time". That star or whatever it sees may not be there anymore. We find out how old a star is by it's lifecycles, not how long it takes a photon to reach us.

    Here is where Brian is wrong. There are places in the night sky, our orbit around the sun and all - where you can see less and more stars. The sky isn't static. In the southern hemisphere you not only see different constellations, you see fewer. But during our pole shift the number of stars in the sky will be about equal for both halves of the planet. Beyond that geometry, looking into the Milky Way will yield different numbers of stars depending on where you look at it too, and what part of the year you're in. Peering through the center of the Milky Way you may see other galaxies, but we have a few galaxy clusters if you look away from the center of the galaxy too. On the map of the universe, we aren't near the center of the universe at all. By measuring the speeds that Galaxies fly away from each other, we have triangulated that we are (the entire milky way) somewhere near the edge. So looking away from the mathematical center of the universe allows us to see only a few galaxies. On our own Galaxy, we are near the outer tip of one of the spiral arms. The Galaxy also rotates, and as it rotates, our arm is sometimes pointed inward toward the center, and sometimes outward. This process is really slow (I'm not sure of how long, google that too) but it does happen.

    So yea, we do often see more or less stars in the sky.
     
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