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anyone buy from antonline.com ?

Discussion in 'Members' Lounge' started by jeffie7, Apr 2, 2007.

  1. jeffie7

    jeffie7 Wrong Whole! VIP

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    I bought a simple 23 dollar decibel reader from this company, the company is one of the many that sells things on amazon.com
    This is an e-mail I sent them tonight.....

    Discover had been very good in the past about disputes like this and I don't doubt that they'll help me out with this.
    It just pisses me off that it has to go that way for such a SIMPLE thing. all they have to do is call UPS and open a claim... easy right?
    I've done it before for my customers it's really not that hard to do. dial the 1800 # and say hey we have a problem... DONE!

    bah
     
  2. dveit

    dveit Well-Known Member VIP

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    First of all, you're horrible at writing professional business letters. Your grammar is atrocious and on par with about a 3rd grader.

    Secondly, good luck.

    :p
     
  3. TommyTheCat

    TommyTheCat Gonzo Scientist

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    Beyond any grammatical errors, you should be purchasing these meters:

    Home, industrial, etc. measurement
    Radio Shack meter ($50, the god damned universal industry standard - any job)
    Behringer ECM8000 mic, UB802 mixer, w/sound card and software ($120+, suited toward speaker measurement based on software's ability)

    Car
    TermLab Sensor ($650+, Official dB meter of most Car Sound organizations)
    splmeter.com's dBm-x ($70+, cheap meters that are not accurate, but moderatly precise)

    I've not seen any other product until you get up to Bruel & Kjaer level equipment that is worth a second look. So what the hell are you using a dB meter for anyways?
     
  4. smarty009

    smarty009 Senior Member

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    good luck getting anything out of that...i had a friend who had UPS "deliver" something and he never got it...hmmm...UPS FTL!
     
  5. jeffie7

    jeffie7 Wrong Whole! VIP

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    Yeah no doubt my grammar skills lack, nothing new there.

    I just need to check some basic DB levels around the house and work. For what I'm doing I don't need anything outside of a basic cheap reader.
     
  6. TommyTheCat

    TommyTheCat Gonzo Scientist

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    Eh, still wouldn't trust a meter cheaper than the RS - especially if you want to determine what kind of exposure times you can safely withstand. 3db deviations account for doubling/halving of power which can half/double exposure times (respectively).
     
  7. jeffie7

    jeffie7 Wrong Whole! VIP

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    I'm looking at it this way, anything over 80db is to much. If I can get a reader that is able to get give or take 5 db up or down from 85 then I'm fine with it.

    I'm not testing it out on anything audio wise. Im testing it on things like vacuum cleaners, blinders, exhaust of my car, DBs made inside the car from having the windows down.

    I'm just trying to get in the area of how loud things are.
     
  8. TommyTheCat

    TommyTheCat Gonzo Scientist

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    Those are examples of "testing audio wise" - its all sound.

    80db is playing it too safe, you'll have to go pretty far out of your way to maintain that. Not to say you'll die if you go over, but it would almost be a challenge to go about your normal day and not average over 85db for significant periods.

    Also, make sure you're getting at least a true A-weighted device - the midband frequencies (2000-8000Hz) are really the most susceptable to damage because of our ears' sensitivity. You can take much more bass than midband material, over 20db more (so 80db at 3kHz, while 100 at 100Hz - even more lower than that). So that Bulldozer poses less of a threat than that screaming baby.
     
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