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Autoerotica

Discussion in 'Members' Lounge' started by Celerity, Jul 16, 2004.

Do I stay, or do I go-go

  1. Stay and work with these cars. In a few years, say 10 leave

    100.0%
  2. Stay until something better comes along

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  3. Quit now and use your time to find a real job

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  4. Stay, learn all the skills, and leave next year

    0 vote(s)
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  5. Demand more money and make it perf

    0 vote(s)
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  1. Celerity

    Celerity Well-Known Member

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    So I have this new job.

    I work for a company in Connecticut that restores old cars, as well as works on exotica like Ferrari, Lamborghini, and the such.

    First: The work. I am an apprentice. So I have no formal experience in automechanics, yet I am trusted to perform tasks, and slowly get trusted to touch more and more involved things on increasingly high-dollar cars. I sweep up, take out the garbage, blah blah.. Shop Bitch. But I also have to learn high-end body work. So I sand fenders all day long, or I'll be assigned to prep a car for body work / paint. About 2 hours a day are spent washing cars with sterile rags and toothbrushes. I stink of Armorall.

    Second: The people. I'm one of 6 people there. There are two mechanics, one works on mechanical things, and the other is dedicated to body work. The owner knows his shit, but he takes more time upstairs running the company, and meet-and-greet. His son started working there the same week as I, and of course get anything because he's the son. But he's the nicest person there, and will bend over backwards to help. Then a part-time guy to run the office (Also a really nice guy) and a part-time guy to do special projects (Kind of a prick). Both mechanics are pretty hard to get along with too.

    Third: The shop. It's a 13,000 sqft facility. Split one way for a shop, and the other half is a body shop. Upstairs is an engine building facility, and the "Quiet time" workbenches for rebuilding gauges and old stuff. There is no AC and its hot as hades.

    Fourth: The cars. I actually get to drive and work on, in one way or another, Ferrari, Aston Martin, Mercedes Benz (Like, 500k+ Pebble beach cars), Austins, and even some American steel (Mostly 60's full sizers). The cars are typically pre-69, but the owners of these multi-million dollar cars also has the shop work on their recent cars (Like I worked on a Ferrari F355 today).

    Fifth: Pros and Cons.
    Pros:
    . I get experience that I normally wouldn't be able to get. It's like going to school for free. they actually teach me things, and then hand me show cars and other high-dollar cars to work on. They trust me, and I haven't let them down yet.
    . I can use this experience to open my own shop. In a few months, my friend is getting some money and wants to open an import and custom shop - And I wanna help. I'm sick of working for the man.
    . I can stay here, and within a few years become a specialist. You know how much a "Ferrari Mechanic" makes?
    Cons:
    . The pay is low.
    . There is no insurance.
    . The shop is always too full to bring my own projects in.
    . Even afterhours and on the weekends, I will never get the keys before being there for at least 6 years. Basically, I can't work on my own things there.
    . The hours are 8:00 to 5:00, and he freaks when someone is late by 5 minutes.
    . Most of the people I work with are miserable twirps.
    . Working takes away time to look for jobs.


    Cliff's Notes: I was brought on to try out for 2 weeks. I try them out, they try me out. During that time I was paid $12 an hour, under the table. The agreement was to "See how well I do" and then talk about pay from there. Today my 2 weeks are up. I didn't get any pay raise at all. I can't live on $12 an hour. My absolute minimum needs are $14 an hour. I need insurance. I haven't had health insurance in 10 years. I run out of things to do, literally, and I have to make my time completely accountable to work there. In other words, I get docked and noted if I'm not doing something "To make the company money".

    He said today that he would talk about more money when I prove my value to the shop. Basically, I make them money and he gives me money. No amounts or durations were verified - and he was very vague about the whole situation. So the job kinda sucks, in my opinion. I can do better - Or stay in IT and deal with a work shortage - But a good paycheck when work comes in.

    But the cars are something else. It feels so good to work on these things. It's so .. Upper Class to be a mechanic like this. And, they are giving me a shot. So what do you guys think?

    -> Steve
     
  2. BigJ

    BigJ I'm just about that action Boss. VIP

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    I say stay and learn the stuff. It'll be an experience.

    I'd kill to work at a euro shop, even for minimum wage myself.

    My dad's friend from high school has a euro shop and they do only maserati's, porsche's, some vw's, ferrari's, lambo's, etc. He has a 2 man crew though, and won't hire anyone :(. But the cool thing is, he charges actual labor, not book, and cost for parts for us, but my brother is the only one with a vw, and its a passat.
     
  3. Celerity

    Celerity Well-Known Member

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    On a happier note, since this guy's Son is taking over the business in 2 years, and the son is really quite nice and open to the shop - Things could look up.

    I also convinced him that he needs someone there that knows old Hondas and Toyotas - Because those are the next restoration cars :)

    -> Steve
     
  4. NotUrAverage_Si

    NotUrAverage_Si Senior Member

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    :/

    :thumbsup:
     
  5. Airjockie

    Airjockie Watanabe Whore!!!

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    Stick with it, learn as much as you can, and when a better oppertunity comes along...then you'll just get up and leave..... B)

    Something is better than nothing ;)

    And learning a skill, while making a little cash is better than nothing. ;)
     
  6. TurboMirage

    TurboMirage YEEAAAHHH VIP

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    stick with it steve. good to see you with your hands in something. B)
     
  7. xj0hnx

    xj0hnx I wanna be sedated VIP

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    No reason to quit now, a job like that can lead to good things. Take the time and learn from the guys that have "proved their value to the shop". Family owned businesses can be like that, as far as the pay, I'd think it should look up if you don't slack off.

    Cons:
    . The pay is low.

    a specialized job, with no specialized training? could be worse

    . There is no insurance.

    You're should be covered from accidents, and job related injury, get some cheap health insurance

    . The shop is always too full to bring my own projects in.
    . Even afterhours and on the weekends, I will never get the keys before being there for at least 6 years. Basically, I can't work on my own things there.

    just pretend you worked at McDonalds, no garage there either right?

    . The hours are 8:00 to 5:00, and he freaks when someone is late by 5 minutes.

    he likes responsible people, can blame the guy?

    . Most of the people I work with are miserable twirps.

    most people are anywhere.

    . Working takes away time to look for jobs.

    true, but should only be a concern if you can't get along with what you have, if you are happy, and making enough to get by, wait around, things do pop up.
     
  8. Celerity

    Celerity Well-Known Member

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    Yeah, I guess I was just whining. It's a good job, but I'm going to need to do something in my other time to make up for the difference.

    Maybe I'll just tour shows and stuff like that, advertise that I'm a high end mechanic. I'm also thinking of using the money and directing it towards renting a small garage, and making just a paint booth. Then I can push myself as the worlds first non-crack addicted body guy.

    -> Steve
     
  9. allbottledup

    allbottledup Senior Member

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    I wish i could find a job like that...im sure a lamborghini mechanic would pay pretty well!
     
  10. tab

    tab Super Moderator

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    I'm doing pretty much the same thing Steve. I'm learning from a 30 year veteran mechanic. The only differences are that I get the benefits, $17+ per hour, I can bring my shit in the shop, and I get days off whenever I need to. I don't have as much accountablility either, I just have to keep busy.

    Then again, I don't get to rebuild Ferraris or test drive any Bentley's or anything like that. Dozers and boom trucks are fun, but not quite as classy. :p

    It's totally worth it, if you continue to learn a lot on the job. You'll make more money later, especially when you learn what those mechanics know. I started off twiddling my thumbs and asking what to do next. Now, people bring me stuff to work on all the time, because they know I'll get the job done, quickly. That's the way it works. You prove yourself, the work will come to you. You won't be the shop bitch forever.
     
  11. tab

    tab Super Moderator

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    One other thing. Protect yourself. Use all the personal protective equipment that they provide you, and buy some good shoes/boots. Your ears, eyes, lungs, and back are gonna take a beating in that environment. I wear earmuffs with protective lenses for grinding. I have orthopedic steel toe shoes that I wear every day. We weld a lot at my shop, and the smoke is about enough to choke you sometimes. Grinding and sanding are not good either.

    These things are not that important for infrequent exposure. However, if this is to become your possible occupation, then take care of yourself. No one else will.
     
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