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Brake sensitivity

Discussion in 'General Tech and Maintenance' started by zueke, Apr 13, 2004.

  1. zueke

    zueke Senior Member

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    Alright, so both my brother and I have Del Sols. It comes in handy when we are trying to compare something like an assembly, a noise, or in this case pedal travel. My brakes have been bled the same way as his, (push pedal, open valve, release pedal, close valve), on all 4 wheels, but my pedal travel goes in like 3 inches before any braking occurs. His on the other hand, almost full braking occurs at 2 inches. (Noticable braking at 1 inch)

    So my question I guess is does the procedue for bleeding the brakes sound right? If so, then is there anywhere else in the line that could have air that I don't know about bleeding?

    Finally, my car is a 1994 with stock lines, and his a 93 with stock lines. Is it possible that my lines just need replacement?

    Ideas?
     
  2. asmallsol

    asmallsol Super Moderator

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    i doubt that your lines are going to give you that much pedal travel, however, stainless steall lines do cut pedal travel to almost nothing before the brakes activate. Pull off your mastercylinder (keep lines attached so not to leak any fluid) have your brother push the pedal down, and measure the pushrod travel.
     
  3. DarkHand

    DarkHand Senior Member VIP

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    Unless that was a typo, you may be sucking air into your lines. If the valve is open when you release the pedal, you'll pull air into the lines while doing so. If you don't have one of those one-man brake bleeding kits it should be more like:

    Slight pressure on pedal
    Open valve
    Push pedal
    Close valve
    Release pedal

    That way when you let up on the pedal, air isn't pulled into the lines, only brake fluid from the master cylinder. Make sure to keep it topped up while doing so.
     
  4. asmallsol

    asmallsol Super Moderator

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    lol, I didn't even catch that. Yea, if your bleeding that way, your sucking up air. Pump a few times with the valve closed, hold the pedal with pressure on oit, then open the valve. Fluid will squirt out and the pedal will drop to the floor, then close the valve, then it is safe to let go of the pedal. Repeat several times. It is a good idea to put a clear hose over the bleeder screw, and put the other end in a jar, so that way you can see air bubbles coming out.
     
  5. driverunknown

    driverunknown Senior Member

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    Be sure to bleed the wheel farthest from the master cylinder. So rear right, rear left, front right, and front left.


    Do it in that order.
     
  6. TDaddy

    TDaddy Senior Member

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    Bleeding sequence for '95 civic del sol is:

    1. RR
    2. FL
    3. RL
    4. FR

    as for your problem, you might check behind your brake pedal for the pushrod locknut position...
     
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