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Fish eyes in paint. help please.

Discussion in 'Body / Exterior / Interior / Cosmetics' started by mdhillmann, Mar 29, 2010.

  1. mdhillmann

    mdhillmann New Member

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    Im painted my car this weekend and using base coat clear coat and wiped it down with acetone really good. wiped on wet and wipe off dry and i started painting the base coat and had fish eyes in some areas and didnt like it so i stopped painting. What should i do!! Could someone help me? Should i wet sand the base coat down to the sandable primer? and what should i prep the car with?
     
  2. ricksautomotive

    ricksautomotive honda dealer tech

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    what are "fish eyes"? like round drips on the paint? what colors are you working with?
     
  3. TurboMirage

    TurboMirage YEEAAAHHH VIP

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    Solution: What's a "fish eye"? A small, white dot, surrounded by a ring of paint — caused when paint for various reasons will not stick to the surface. Fish eye is most often caused by a spot of oil, grease or wax on the surface. The best way to prevent it is to clean the surface well before painting. If you spot a fish eye in your finish:
    Stop your work. Let the paint dry as is for at least 24 hours.
    Sand the surface with #400 or finer grit sandpaper until the fish eye is gone and the primer coat appears. Clean the surface well with alcohol and begin the painting process again.
    Note: The best method to counter this is to pre-clean the surface well before you begin. This will stop it before it starts.
     
  4. ricksautomotive

    ricksautomotive honda dealer tech

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    thanks for clearing that up for me. i have hung around the body shop for about 15 years and have never gotten into how the $10,000 paint jobs are done flawlessly. after 45 years in the body shops my choice painter is gonna retire in a few more years at most so i'll have to either find a new painter or learn myself how to execute flawless finishes. sometimes i get customers wanting me to restore or customize their classic rides and they know the painter i use is good at painting and thats as important as a good engine build and installation. maybe more important. so painting rides may become an expansion of services for me to offer customers. i already have paint guns and foam sanding blocks in various sizes as well as oscillating sanders and buffers. but if i cant do it right i wont do it at all. i know that clean dust free surfaces are a must but i didnt know the fish eyes are a tell tale sign that all is not as it should be. thanks again.
     
  5. invisibledemon

    invisibledemon Bored Moderator VIP

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    moved into your own thread. seeing as you pretty much already have an excellent answer from turbo this may not help you much.
    but, you should check the dates on a thread before you bump it. that one was from 2004. im surprised you got help.


    what did you do to prep the car for paint aside from wiping it down with acetone?
    did you sand out all the imperfections? did you prime?
     
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