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getting rid of orange peel?

Discussion in 'Body / Exterior / Interior / Cosmetics' started by ssl2k, Jul 26, 2004.

  1. ssl2k

    ssl2k Senior Member

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    Okay I just sprayed the bike im working on and it came out pretty decent except there are bumps all over... I put like 3-4 thin coats on with roughly 5-10mins flash time. (i didn'twant any runs)

    so im guessing i just wet sand w/ like 2000 grit and then go after it with my buffer and that shit should buff right out correct?

    nathan
     
  2. ssl2k

    ssl2k Senior Member

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    oh yeah...

    i forgot to ask, how can i avoid getting orange peel?


    I sprayed my clear @ about 24psi

    if i spray at like 20-21 it doens't atomize.

    nathan
     
  3. tab

    tab Super Moderator

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    You're confusing pressure with volume. If you have orange peel, then you definitely needed to apply more clear with each pass. Be less afraid to make a run. This is why: A run is much easier to buff out than a whole paintjob. You don't have to go nuts, but as a beginner, you should fault on the heavy side. With experience, you'll develop an eye for the correct amount to apply.

    Pressure and volume. You can have pressure without moving any material. Pump your compressor up to 130 psi. The air isn't going anywhere until you open a valve. This concept applies to both air and paint(and everything else, but.....).

    So, set your pressure to the proper level. After that, you have volume control knobs for paint and air. I typically set my air valve to nearly wide open. That helps "atomize" the paint better. At this point, I adjust the paint volume knob. Do this with laquer thinner before you actually paint.

    As for the rubbing out......If I were you, I'd probably rub that out with wet or dry 500 grit, then reshoot one or two nice wet coats. I hate orange peel. Hopefully you still have paint left. If the paint is rough, and it's a light color, I'd start wetsanding with 1000 grit, then move upward as needed. The heavier grit will help knock down the high spots faster, but you'll need to wetsand with 1500 or 2000 before buffing(more than likely, and maybe both). Soapy water helps.
     
  4. ssl2k

    ssl2k Senior Member

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    i am out of clear coat and out of budget as far as this project is going.

    im going to just wetsand it + maybe put on a coat in a rough spot ( i have about 4oz of clear left)

    i will just wetsand + buff and that is as good as it is going to get i guess

    nathan
     
  5. tab

    tab Super Moderator

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    The darker the color, the worse that the paint will show marks. On black, I'd start with 1500-2000.

    Wet sand the paint smooth, and try not to sand through the clear completely. Then buff it.
     
  6. swanny

    swanny Senior Member

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    Couple other tips for ya-
    Check your wetsanding block frequently for any sort of sand or dirt (looks like little white zig-zag lines on the paper)
    And a wal-mart buffer probably won't do the trick, invest in a high speed buffer with interchangeable pads, not the little elastic diaper looking ones you get on the wal-mart issue ones.
     
  7. ssl2k

    ssl2k Senior Member

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    yeah

    i tired the buffer and it is okay....

    i'll be buying a real buffer soon

    they are like $200

    :(
    nathan
     
  8. tab

    tab Super Moderator

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    A $60 sander/polisher from Sears works just fine. The speed adjustment isn't as good, but it works. Then invest in a couple of foam pad buffers from your local paint store. They're about 10" around, and pretty durable if you don't catch edges with them. Work a small area at a time, and don't get the paint too hot from buffing.
     
  9. hcivic.com

    hcivic.com Senior Member

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    try spraying a thiner mix also
     
  10. ssl2k

    ssl2k Senior Member

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    i do i make it thiner ? it is a urathene clear coat = onyl 2 parts, the clear and the harder

    nathan
     
  11. tab

    tab Super Moderator

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    Most of the products I use are:

    Clearcoat, reducer, and hardener(catalyst).
    You can add a tiny bit more reducer, and a tiny bit more hardener to the mix and the layout is much nicer. Ask your paint rep what the proper amount is.

    I liked the House of Kolor(HOK) clear for that reason. They gave specific instructions right on the container of thinning down the topcoats. I liked that. :)

    www.houseofkolor.com I believe.
     
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