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I have a question!

Discussion in 'Civic and del Sol - EG and EK' started by EJ2 civic, Apr 21, 2008.

  1. EJ2 civic

    EJ2 civic New Member

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    There can be many varieties of answers to this question, so I want to see what kind of information or even theories you guys can sum up. A GSR swap is about to happen soon in an EG and I was wondering...

    - How can a 1994 GSR motor (13-14 years old) have such low km's, or so the suppliers say? Hypothetically, assuming that most reputable motor swap dealers are truthful, how and why are these Japanese motors of all sorts have such low km's?

    - I originally wanted to get the ODBII GSR because they’re 96-2001, so I guess they’re more new motors; but I am reluctant to get them because my car is ODBI, and wiring would be difficult. So let me ask you guys, would the cost benefit principal say that I would be better off with the simplicity of the ODBI motor which may suffer in reliability solely because of its old age, or more beneficial to pitch in a few hundred dollars for the ODBII-ODBI conversion harness so I get a newer motor? With the conversion harness, is the swap literally a drop in and plug in?

    - Or am I being paranoid and underestimating the reliability and durability of Honda motors?
     
  2. BrutalB83

    BrutalB83 Brutal Moderator Moderator VIP

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    Japan is totally different than the US regarding emissions laws. At a certain point in a Japanese vehicle's life (I believe 5 years old, please correct me if I'm wrong) you have to start paying a tax every year, a fee for driving an older car if you will. That's why you see so many low-mileage Japanese engines for sale, they came from cars that people junked or traded in for newer ones to avoid paying those fees.
     
  3. SlushboxTeggy

    SlushboxTeggy It's only stupid if it doesn't work VIP

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    And at the same time, I've seen many OBD2 motors with hundreds of thousands of miles on them. If your really paranoid, rebuild the motor before you install it. If not, I would still recommend giving it a tune up, changing out the timing belt, water pump, and oil pump for new ones.
     
  4. AHHVTEC

    AHHVTEC Well-Known Member VIP

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    correct its either 3 or 5 years, we have low mile jdm motors because they have to do away with them after so many miles or 3 to 5 years witch ever comes first
     
  5. BrutalB83

    BrutalB83 Brutal Moderator Moderator VIP

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    :werd:

    The age of the motor isn't a great determinant of it's condition. An older motor could be very low mileage and in great shape, where as a newer OBD2 motor could have super high mileage and be beat to hell.

    Like SlushboxTeggy said, if you're worried you can always do a tune-up or re-build before you install it...
     
  6. hondacivicdx92

    hondacivicdx92 Hamby

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    if you absolutely have to have a newer motor (obd2) then you can still just buy a good used obd1 ecu and it will plug right in and everything will work fine, thats what i did when i did the B18B1 swap in my 92 hatch because my motor came out of a 98 integra
     
  7. armluv

    armluv New Member

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    the 5 year jdm rumor is just that A RUMOR. When importers starting importing jdm engines they used the low mileage low year engine as a gimmick and since there is really no way to prove them wrong and with the rise of import rookies over the last 5 to ten years it is now become the best sold urban legend to date. DON'T TAKE MY WORD FOR IT. I have only been in Japan for 3 years out of the last five. Try to find the year any JDM engine was made or the mileage on it YOU CAN'T. There is also no written law in Japan about a five year tax or fee, all cars in japan are taxed the same way, on there value.

    As far as OBD-I or OBD-II as far as i Know one is not better then the other and the decision to use on or the other depends solely on the engine and components you choose to use. If you get a jdm engine or even a usdm engine that you have no knowledge about you should rebuild it. ie bearings, rings, valves, new seals and gaskets at a minimum. If you are doing it for performance decide how much power/torque you want to produce and make decisions about what to do for your rebuild ie. sleeves, head work, block work, tranny all before you start otherwise you will not have the funds budgeted right to complete your build in a timely manner and be fustrated with the whole thing. I have seen many people do this and end up selling everything before they finish. so to wrap up Figure out what you want to do and build towards that. if you want to save the couple of hundred on the OBD-I then do but that does give you a basis on what to purchase. better then a guy who buys alot of parts and realizes he can't use them together...

    hope this helps you.
     
  8. AHHVTEC

    AHHVTEC Well-Known Member VIP

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    by any chance did you go to a jdm junk yard and look at the gauge cluster for miles on it
     
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