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Leaky oil plug

Discussion in 'General Tech and Maintenance' started by cheese9988, Jan 10, 2005.

  1. cheese9988

    cheese9988 Senior Member VIP

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    I have a DOHC ZC motor, it keeps leaking from the oil plug. I have tried putting a new washer and plug there and it still keeps on leaking, I suspect it is the threads. Anyone know of a easy fix for this? Or do I need to re-thread it and throw a bigger plug on there?
     
  2. hcivic.com

    hcivic.com Senior Member

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    did you tighten it correctly
     
  3. projectxspeed

    projectxspeed Senior Member

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    you could use a sealer on the bolt and that would stop your leak
     
  4. Crix

    Crix Senior Member

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    Get another oil pan. Or use alot of Hondabond after you tighten it the best you can.
     
  5. dave_255

    dave_255 Member

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    yeah it looks like your gonna have to rethread it or you could use some sealent tape everytime you change your oil.
     
  6. 94RedSiGal

    94RedSiGal Senior Member

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    You need to use an oversized drain plug now. I went through this with my Si. At around 100K miles, the threads got stripped by my dealership. I feel the kid at the dealership doing the oil changes was overtightening the plug as he started out there as just one of the lot boys. So then I went to my other Honda mechanics and they tried an oversized plug... which lasted me until the car hit about 240K miles. At that point, it started leaking again and I had to replace the oil pan.

    It's really important not to overtighten the drain plug and to always use a fresh crush washer. :ph34r:
     
  7. driverunknown

    driverunknown Senior Member

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    why wouldn't you just rethread it?
     
  8. 94RedSiGal

    94RedSiGal Senior Member

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    You need a GOOD seal with that drain plug. First, that area is leaking because the threads are tired and worn from use. Just rethreading and cleaning up the thread pattern isn't going to improve the seal in that area. I'll call my old mechanics in a couple of hours to ask exactly what they did and what size plug they used on my oil pan. All I know is that for many years, the problem was solved with nary a drop of oil underneath the car on my driveway. When the oversized plug finally wasn't good enough, I was there underneath the car with the mechanic. As he removed the plug to drain out the old oil, a small section of thread came out with the plug... the mechanic saw that and was very careful putting it back in later on, but I was told to watch for a leak and then to consider getting a new oil pan for the next oil change. So that night I put a piece of cardboard under my engine. When I saw some oil on it the next morning, that was it and I had my oil pan changed that week. I love my Si too damn much to gamble on that sort of shit.

    Well when you retap a threaded hole, you are both straightening the old threads and some of the sides are getting scraped out also. You need that oversized bolt to meet up with the outer edges perfectly to keep that oil in between oil changes. Therefore the old plug will be undersized for that application.

    Otherwise, my sedan is still on her original oil pan without any issues.
     
  9. driverunknown

    driverunknown Senior Member

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    I see your point, but what I meant was to use inserts that matchup the original size of the bolt.

    If done right, they should seal right?
    Did you ask your mechanic about this?
     
  10. 94RedSiGal

    94RedSiGal Senior Member

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    I've got to drive down to the garage to ask them this in person. I called them twice today and they were really busy. As I don't visit them as much as I used to for work, I think that it would be more considerate to go down there myself. When they first suggested using the oversized plug, they said that it should last for a good while. Again, it's always important not to overtighten that plug. On any older car, it's smart to always keep an eye on the fluid levels and check for leakages.

    I did see an ad for threaded inserts to replace the old ones (not specifically for oil pans), but that would be a more expensive fix, plus I would think that one needs to really clean that area thoroughly for a good seal with the threaded insert... so I think retapping for a slightly larger drain plug is the simpler and better way.

    And why try so hard to keep using an oem drain plug? *shrug*

    On a side note... it is always important when installing an oil pan, not to over torque the bolts on that too. Only 3 ft lbs of torque is needed. Too much and it will leak. Just ask TurboMirage. B)
     
  11. driverunknown

    driverunknown Senior Member

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    That's funny about the oil pan.
    Bah, I'll just buy the size that's bigger on that easy drain stuff, you never have to turn the plug with a wrench once the main plug is in.
    i had it on my old d-series for over a year with zero problems ;)
     
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