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Need Physics on SS lines

Discussion in 'Wheels / Suspension / Tires / Brakes' started by asmallsol, Sep 12, 2003.

  1. asmallsol

    asmallsol Super Moderator

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    Will pressure on the piston increase with SS lines. Pascals law says fluid in a closed containor exerts = pressure in all directions. Because of the swelling of OE rubber lines, will that kinda throw the Law off because the flexing is in a way, like a way to make the contaior not perfectly closed. Isn't kind of like a non isolated system since your expelling some of your pressure into the rubber lining vs the Piston.
     
  2. E_SolSi

    E_SolSi Member of the 20 nut club Moderator VIP

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    ummmm i have them
    the brakes are a lot touchy-er
    and you can feel the brakes a lot more

    probly doesnt help at all
     
  3. asmallsol

    asmallsol Super Moderator

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    that sounds scientefic :lol:
     
  4. CRX-YEM

    CRX-YEM Super Moderator Moderator VIP

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    This can't change Pascal's law. It's still a closed system the rubber is an elastic material
    which swells as you know and in a way has a parasitic effect and the pressure in the line decreases. with a SS line the tube can't expand which in theory the pressure on the caliper piston should increase slightly probably not more than 1 PSI.

    If I knew the volume of the master cylinder resivior and the diameter of the piston in the master cyl, the diameter of the caliper piston we could figure it out quite easily
     
  5. phunky.buddha

    phunky.buddha Admin with a big stick Admin VIP

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    Think of the rubber brake line as a buffer or capacitor for pressure... it "absorbs" some of the pressure from your foot and the hydraulic fluid before it allows the full force to be exerted on the brake piston. You'll have a slight delay in SS vs rubber because of the rubber wall flex, but not much more beyond that.

    I guess your maximum pressure could increase some because there are no more rubber walls to take up the "slack" in the system after you go to SS lines, but you're still able to mash your foot down on the brake pedal until it's solid with the rubber lines, right? You'll probably have slightly higher pressure if you bring your foot down to the exact same maximum pedal travel as you did with the rubber lines, but you WERE still able to "max out" your brake pedal with the rubber lines, so your max pressure wouldn't really go up that much.

    I know it's kinda wordy, but hopefully you get what I'm trying to say.

    The main advantage to using SS lines is to get better pedal feel and brake control.
     
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