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Printer memory question

Discussion in 'Members' Lounge' started by reckedracing, Oct 8, 2004.

  1. reckedracing

    reckedracing TTIWWOP VIP

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    i have a HP laserjet 4000 at work for printing tax returns...

    it has an option to upgrade the memory up to 100mb, it comes stock with 4mb, and can be increased in intervals of 4, 8, 16, 32...

    i can not find any information on it, so i was wondering if its worth it to increase the memory...?

    anyone know?

    hp says it would help for LARGE print jobs... but wtf is considered large...
    i don't think tax returns are considered high graphics but i'm not sure...
     
  2. pissedoffsol

    pissedoffsol RETIRED

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    if youre printing a page here and there, 4mb is fine.

    if your going to spool up 1000 sheets with 5 different users hitting it at the same time, the 4mb system will get hurt, if not crash.

    more is always better..
    but it really comes down to what your office needs.

    if your printer is running constantly, more ram = good.

    if a couple pages go off an hour, the 4mb slot is fine
     
  3. reckedracing

    reckedracing TTIWWOP VIP

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    thanks for the reply B

    single user printer, but it gets lag...

    not sure if its the computer, or the printer...

    it'll print a page or two, then say processing, then print some more pages...

    single user but a normal tax return runs from 50 to 150 pages average?

    the tax program is real slow, but i think it prepares the whole print job before sending it, so i'm thinking the bottle neck is with the printer itself...
     
  4. pissedoffsol

    pissedoffsol RETIRED

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    if you got the cash- up it to 16 or 32. but theres no need to go to 96 (why it says it takes 100 is beyond me... good luck finding a non-base8 chip)
     
  5. phunky.buddha

    phunky.buddha Admin with a big stick Admin VIP

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    Well, he did say that it had a base RAM count of 4MB, and that it could be upgraded with standard chips after that- so 4MB plus 96MB = 100MB right? It probably has two slots.

    Here's how it breaks down. Your printer needs the RAM to render each page that it prints. When you send a 50kB Word file, the printer turns the information (depending on its internal logic) into some kind of graphic format, then throws all those millions of dots onto a page. One page of a Word document can end up being quite a few megs of information. Graphic files can take up even more room inside the printer, so they need more RAM. Sometimes just one very graphic intensive page can be over 50MB, and if your printer doesn't have enough memory to store all the information it needs to print that one page, it will just reject it I've seen this happen before on the printers in my old lab, and it's ridiculous when you're rejecting documents on a printer with 64MB of RAM because it can't render one page properly.

    Queueing tons of documents- if you're in an office and you just print directly to the printer, the amount of RAM on board determines how many documents it can store in its own memory. If you have a separate computer serving information to the printer, then on board RAM doesn't really matter for document storage. The server keeps track of everything going to the printer and sends more information when needed.

    By looking at what kind of network setup you have feeding your printer and what kind of jobs you typically print, you can spec out the amount of memory that you want to use. I always just recommend maxing out the memory banks on the printers I had to buy, but my area was printing constantly on multiple printers pushing more than 24ppm, and quite a bit of the jobs were very graphic intensive.
     
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