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Quick question...

Discussion in 'HYBRID -> EG-EK / DC' started by Hondatuner88, Jan 14, 2006.

  1. Hondatuner88

    Hondatuner88 Senior Member

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    Can anyone answer that one for me?? And can I put this swap in my 94 hatch? I know I dont need mounts, I got the axles and shift linkage. Also a PR3 ecu? Will that also work?? PLEASE HELP!!!! What must I change??

    Thanks,

    Koby
     
  2. integrawow

    integrawow Member

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    92-93 integra is OBD1 just like your 94 hatch. Just make sure that you use an OBD1 vtec ecu, otherwise you will have to get a jumper harness to be able to use a different OBD ecu. And some of the SOHC hatches come with VTEC, so just may not have to wire your car for vtec, but if it didn't, then you will have to add the appropriate wires for vtec. It's really just that simple.

    If any members feel that I missed any info here, please reply.
     
  3. Hondatuner88

    Hondatuner88 Senior Member

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    Thanks!....but now about that trans..I got to get a hydo to cable mount right? And will my vx engine harness work on that motor? What about things like the EGR valve and so fourth on my old harness?

    and also what OBD1 ecu do I need? P30 or P28?
     
  4. integrawow

    integrawow Member

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    Just get a hydro tranny, and use 94 integra mounts, axles, and intermediate shaft, and shift linkage. The thing should fall right into place. Hasport does make a hydro to cable tranny conversion for the EG, but for simplicity, just get a hydro tranny. Then again, the hydro tranny will cost alot more than a conversion bracket, but it depends on how good of a deal you can get on a hydro tranny.

    Just for reference, your VX has a 5 wire O2 sensor, the DX has a 4 wire O2 sensor, and a CX has a 1 wire O2 sensor. The goal is to have a 4 wire O2 sensor. This why the DX is more desireable for some people, only because alot of people don't realize how easy it probably is to convert from a 5 wire O2, to a 4 wire O2. There is an article in the swap information part of this site that explains how to rewire a VX to a 4 wire O2 sensor. You should be able to use the D-series wiring harness, you'll just be changing the O2 sensor wiring, and using an ecu that was designed to control a b-series engine.

    Here's the link:

    http://www.hondaswap.com/forums/index.php?showtopic=14242

    About the ecu, just use whatever ecu that came with the OBD1 engine.

    The swap is really straight forward.

    P.S.- I have edited this post at least 10 times, so you may want to reread it again.
     
  5. Hondatuner88

    Hondatuner88 Senior Member

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    Thanks again...Ive swaped motors before just not anything like this...Well, We put a B18C1 (GSR) in my brothers hatchback but that was all just a plug and play operaton. And it never ran right to start with. About getting a hydo trans, Everyone I know wants a good buck for a LSD hydo trans. I already got the Cable LSD trans sitting here..thats why I asked about the conversion bracket. Does anyone else besides hasport have a kit? It would look dumb with just one billet mount and the rest stock peices. And also in that link about converting the O2 sensor. My computer don't show the pics. I don't know why they don't. And was there any EG civic that has a 4 wire O2 and still vtec? Si? Thanks again you've really inspired me to take this on finally!

    THANK YOU!!! [​IMG]
     
  6. integrawow

    integrawow Member

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    There is a member on this forum that can better answer some of your questions, because he has alot more knoweledge about the EG b-series swap. His username is 92civicb18b1, and you could probably PM this guy.

    I can tell you this though, just wire for 4 wire O2, and run the wires that operate the vtec controls separately. If the car that you have came with a vtec SOHC engine, then the wires for vtec activation should already be there, and it is just a matter of making sure that they are in the appropriate pinout location for a b-series vtec ecu.

    About the bracket for the tranny, just do a google search to find out if anyone else makes one. Password JDM just might have one.

    Like I said though, 92civicb18b1 knows alot more about this swap than I do. He should be able to answer any questions that you may have.
     
  7. drpenguin

    drpenguin Senior Member

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    umm my b16 came from a 91 XSI and its OBD0. wernt all integras 91-93 obd0? or did they switch for 92-93? i know the 94-95 were obd1 and most had the b18b in them, but i could be wrong
     
  8. Hondatuner88

    Hondatuner88 Senior Member

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    BTW...I just looked at my O2 sensor and its a 4 wire...Not a 5 wire...Now what?
     
  9. Hondatuner88

    Hondatuner88 Senior Member

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  10. Exodus

    Exodus Junior Member

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    90-91 Integra XSi engines are OBD0 with cable transaxles. The 92-93 Integra XSi was in the same four year generation as the 90-91s (hence the constant reference to 90-93) however the OBD changed over in 92. OBD is a mandated change over, so this generation has two OBD styles in it.

    The 92-93 XSi B16A also makes I believe 10 more HP and two more ft\lbs of torque while maintaining the cable transaxle. The valve cover is semi-rare from what I understand as it has a larger VTEC emblem than the DOHC emblem right above it, whereas the 88-91 Civic|CRX SiRs and 90-91 Integra XSi B16As have larger DOHC emblems than VTEC emblems. Though trivial, it's a nice added JDM bling factor to your engine bay, especially if a lot of fan-boys get to look under your hood.

    Helical-type limited slip equipped transaxles, I BELIEVE, were available for all of the above mentioned combinations, available in the Y1 and YS1 (JDM YS1 only, not the 92-93 USDM GSR YS1) transaxles as a factory option from the factory. Someone correct me if I'm wrong on this.



    Since you've already got a four wire 02 sensor, that will save you some wiring work. Depending on the trim level of your vehicle, you may still need to wire VTEC, VTEC Oil Pressure (don't forget the branched ground on this circuit) and Knock Sensor for the engine to operate without a cameo from the MIL (malfunction indicator lamp, or Check Engine light in laymens terms). Wiring these is a simple process, you can run the wires straight from the ECU into the engine bay to the connectors, through the factory harnesses, with VTEC controllers, ETC... it's up to you. I prefer to try to modify the interior and engine harnesses to make more of a stock look, however, there isn't anything wrong with running somewhat of a subharness from the ECU through the firewall. Just make sure if you choose the latter option to use wire loom, as ambient temperatures in the engine bay as well as other conditions may damage your wiring and lead you on a wild goose chase to figure out your new found Check Engine light.

    A lot of people snip the wire on the ECU plug that goes into the slot where the new wire must go in and then tee off of that. I recommend de-pinning the wire, snipping the end and then soldering the wire stub and new wire together to ensure a more solid connection as trying to solder while the wiring is still under your dash can prove annoying and difficult. Also, heat shrink is highly recommended to protect the new solder joint. Try to avoid just twisting and taping the new wire to the stub with the pin on it, more often than not it will eventually come undone or not even work properly the first time you start the car after the swap. Using the factory harnesses can prove to be a lengthy process but can be well worth it. You'll need to remove both harnesses and open them up to add circuitry, however, if you've removed anything that uses a circuit from your vehicle, like AC for instance, now would be the time to remove extraneous wiring. Also, this gives you the opportunity to remove old wire loom and\or electrical tape and redo it or also clean the existing harness of any oil, grease, or other nasty stuff to get all over your hands and car. Use a non-CRC based cleaner and spray out the inside of your plugs, followed by compressed air, and you will be less likely to run into any electrical problems in the future. A lot of electrical problems can be subverted when you already have your harness(es) out and readily available to maintenance. Some people will replace a lot of components and spend a lot of money when something goes out, only to find out it was a dirty connector or broken circuit (broken wire) after all of their wasted money, time and effort. Spend the extra time now, do it the way that you want it done and you will have much greater success in the end as well as less hassles down the road :)
     
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