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Rotors

Discussion in 'Wheels / Suspension / Tires / Brakes' started by Capt. Orygun, Mar 27, 2006.

  1. Capt. Orygun

    Capt. Orygun Win the Day

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    anyone heard of Pro-Stop Rotors, from what's I've heard their built with Bembro parts...
     
  2. E_SolSi

    E_SolSi Member of the 20 nut club Moderator VIP

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    they are not made by brembo or with brembo parts
    they are made by power slot

    they are slotted rotors with dimples drilled into the face to give the look of a cross drilled rotor (crap)

    heres a little quote from TireRack.com
    http://www.tirerack.com/brakes/brakes.jsp?...make=PowerSlot&

    once again
    if you want brembos GET BREMBOS
    stop fucking with this "the look of high performance" shit
     
  3. Citizen_Insane

    Citizen_Insane Senior Member

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    brembo blanks are really cheap anyway. just go with those.
     
  4. Cashizslick

    Cashizslick !i!i!i!i!i!i!i!i!i!i!i!

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    Then why are drilled/slotted rotors standard on some cars if they are such a bad idea??
     
  5. E_SolSi

    E_SolSi Member of the 20 nut club Moderator VIP

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    if made by a quality company, both will work for normal driving

    the only real advantage of drilled rotors is that they are lighter than solid rotors... so cross drillings only real advantage is for weight reduction... but it doesnt really become an advantage untill you start running huge rotors that would be heavy as fuck if they were solid... this is obviously a trade off because they are more prone to failure at high temperatures and stress, and the drilling reduced the friction surface (friction surface = brakeing surface) so then you have to make up for the loss in surface area from drilling by having a larger rotor (insert vicious cycle here)

    slotted rotors are not as failure prone as drilled rotors... the main reason for slotting rotors is to constantly shave the surface of the pad removing any glaze that might form on the pad surface... this was much more of a problem several years ago when pad materials were not anywhere as good as they are today (most half decent pads today will not "gas out" like older pads use to, and most of the GOOD pads will not glaze)... the reason that you will still see some track cars running slotted rotors is for a small level of added insurance against the slight posibility of brake glaze... it is not likely with todays materials... slotted rotors still suffer from the same less friction surface area downfall however (less friction surface = less braking surface)... you are starting to see a lot more track cars switching to solid rotors for the greater friction surface area

    then you get to the image factor... the simple fact is that most people look at a cross drilled rotor and immediately think "high performance"... this is why you are starting to see companies offering rotors that are dimpled so they they will have the look of a cross drilled rotor... dimples while not being quite as failure prone as cross drilling still reduce friction surface... combine that with the fact that dimples are almost always combined with slotting and you have a now lost a fairly large percentage of your friction surface (less friction surface = less braking surface) all for the "image" of high performance

    all of this is why you are starting to see a lot of high end car manufacturers finding different materials to make brake rotors out of (like silicon carbide ceramic) that are lighter and stronger as well as have better heat distributing properties... this allows them to run HUGE rotors without issues of them weighing too much... they can drill them without worrying about them overheating and cracking... the pad materials do not glaze or gas at all... and the best part is that they dont wear out any where near as fast... unfortunately these brake systems are currently costing anywhere from $6,000-10,000+ and are not currently available for our hondas, nissans, VWs, mitsus, subies, etc... but if anyone (hosmer???) can get me the entire brake system off a carrera GT or enzo for under $1000 id be happy to be the first person (at least the first person on hondaswap) to do that brake swap :)
     
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