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spark plugs

Discussion in 'General Tech and Maintenance' started by redef91, Feb 3, 2007.

  1. redef91

    redef91 Senior Member

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    i have 91 civic 4dr with ls swap in it with 13k on the motor. im going to be running 75 dry shot. i wanted to use the zex spark plugs. i know there colder, does colder plugs affect the engine when im not using the juice. like for everyday driving. its my daily driver.
     
  2. Autozoner n civic owner

    Autozoner n civic owner Junior Member

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    ngk or nippon denso

    first of all, the only plugs that should go in a honda motor are NGK or Nippon Denso, preferably the NGK plugs. Japanese plugs seem to work really well in the jap motors, conversely if you had a general motors vehicle, an AC Delco plug should be used, Motorcraft plugs for fords. Every vehicle manufacturer has chosen the best plugs for their motors. I realize that this is a performance application, so I would just tell you to change them more often. I would probably not change the heat range of the plug as the motor will run crappy; stick with the oem spec plug. Changing the heat range (refers to how the plug dissipates heat) reduces the efficiency of the motor, ie gas milage, power , and emissions. It would be necessary, however, if the compression ratio is changed, but not for the occasional nitrous spray.
     
  3. redef91

    redef91 Senior Member

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    thanx bro for the info does make sense i was just thinking u know.
     
  4. welfare

    welfare Ancient Member

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    Spoken like a true parts counter person. only some of what you say is right.
    If a person wants to run a colder plug in their car then they should do so, it is not going to have any adverse affects on the engine. If you run a stock plug in a car with nitrous then the plug could melt the first time the No2 is used. Also, Plug manufacturer is a consumer choice, Albeit a stock engine usually works best with oem reccomended parts, I have found that alot of vehicles work very well with bosch or ngk platinum plugs. I don't want to go into internal combustion 101, but alot of vehicles leave much room for improvement in the ignition system. The only reason the vehicle manufacturer didn;t do it was cost effectiveness. Alot of companies will use a cheaper part just to keep the cost of the vehicle manufacturing down. You may not think that is true, but if you are going to produce 1 million vehicles that year and you have a coice between a 1 dollar plug and a 2 dollar plug, multiply that number by the number of cylinders, and then multiply it by 1 million, if it was a 4 clyinder car you are talking 4 million dollars for just a 1 dollar increase for a better spark plug. Just look at alot of manufacturers common problems (ford ball joints, gm intake manifold gaskets, chrysler water pumps, etc. etc.) if they put in a better part to start with no one would have the problems to begin with, but the manufacturer would have had to spen alot more money to correct the problem before it became a problem.
    I would say do your research before choosing a spark plug for your application choosing a spark plug just by brand can cause detonation and spark plug or even engine failure. I'm sure Zex put alot of engineering into their plugs and reccomended them for a No2 applicaiton for a reason. They want you as a return customer, not just a person who bought somethign that is wrong.
     
  5. Taco15

    Taco15 I wear stretchy pants VIP

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    :withstupid: i agree. you HAVE to use a colder plug when using dry shot nitrous. If not you run the risk of completely melting the plug or something worse. the bigger the shot the more the heat in the combustion chamber. I think you have to adjust the timing alittle too. I think its 2 degrees per 100 shot. All my friends that run nitrous do that with their 75 dry shot systems. Even my domestic big block owners with big 300 shot cars. I'm still a noob when it comes to nitrous or turbo but those are the things you HAVE to know before any kind of power addrer is considered.

    you will lose power if you run the cold plugs without n2o but nothing really drastic. Just change them out when you done.
     
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