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tinsel strength

Discussion in 'Engine Building' started by cointelpro, Nov 27, 2003.

  1. cointelpro

    cointelpro Senior Member

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    what is tinsel (spelling) strength? ive heard this used in refference to an engines durability and i was wondering if anyone here knew?

    i know i can find it online somewhere but i figured if i asked here maybe some other people who wanted to know would be able to learn as well, so dont even flame.
     
  2. Tonyd0821

    Tonyd0821 Banned

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    i believe its spelled

    TENSEL strength

    and i believe it is the strength of steel....at which point it will break?

    someone correct me if im halfway there, or completely off....
     
  3. Tonyd0821

    Tonyd0821 Banned

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    and no flaming me either....at least i had the balls to make a guess....
     
  4. cointelpro

    cointelpro Senior Member

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    hehe yea i figured it had something to do with that, but how do they measure it? i mean do they make wires out of the metal and then break them or put the whole engine in a HUGE ass vice and sqeeze it to death (ITS A JOKE DONT FLAME) or what?
     
  5. Bl6CRX

    Bl6CRX Senior Member

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    haha no flamming here, I woulda said it was how strong that silver stuff you hang on your christmas tree is...
     
  6. cointelpro

    cointelpro Senior Member

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    see thats where i got the idea that they make wires out of the metal and test that.. but im not sure.
     
  7. knowledge

    knowledge Senior Member

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    Yup yup you are correct. It means how strong a metal is untill it's breaking point. As for measuring it, there is a formula for each type of metal. It goes by the type of metal, thickness, force upon the metal, also I think(I think) The type of force placed upon the metal! Like pressed together, sheering force, twisted force and so on. Every thing acts differently in different types of forces! I hope you understand what I mean here. I have no idea of the formula's or how to compute them! try to do some searches for it!
     
  8. Tonyd0821

    Tonyd0821 Banned

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    i believe it is set in a machine, and they kinda sorta try to bend it. they look for stress cracks in the metal...and give it some sort of a rating.
     
  9. E_SolSi

    E_SolSi Member of the 20 nut club Moderator VIP

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    its "tensil" and it has to do with the strength of pretty much any material (wood, paper, water, etc...) not just metal

    the best answer i could give would be go to google and search around for information on it
     
  10. Fastciv

    Fastciv Member

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    It is "Tensile" strength, and it is a measure of tension. Imagine holding a rope (or whatever) in both hands and try to pull it apart. The rope is under tension when pulled upon, and it's tensile strength is the amount of force that will cause it to break.
     
  11. E_SolSi

    E_SolSi Member of the 20 nut club Moderator VIP

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    :doh:

    forgot the"e" at the end :( :bash:
     
  12. pills_PMD

    pills_PMD Super Moderator

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    <-- materials science and engineering major with emphasis on mettalurgy...

    tensile strength is correct.

    on a stress strain curve of a material there is a point called the UTS... ultimate tensile strength. the specimen doesn't fail at this point, it is just the point where necking begins to occur.

    it fails soon after that, but once it hits the UTS if you release the load on the object it will not return to its original shape whatsoever, thus it has undergone plastic deformation.

    before the UTS, there is a certain percent of it that will return (elastic deformation) to its original shape...

    quick ghetto diagram example
    [​IMG]
     
  13. ek9r

    ek9r Senior Member

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    what happens after necking ?
     
  14. E_SolSi

    E_SolSi Member of the 20 nut club Moderator VIP

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    generally you try to cop a feel on some titties or something
     
  15. CRX-YEM

    CRX-YEM Super Moderator Moderator VIP

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    The material will be permently deformed.
    The material has been loaded beyound it's elastic limit

    and as pills said it's a ratio
    Young's Modulous of Elasticity ; E= Stress/Strain

    and ideally you want to operate or never produce more load on the material no more than 25% of the value of (Offset Yeild Strenght) often just called yield point. in that situation the material should last indefinetly.

    you were askin how they test the strenght, most of the time it's a destructive test.
    an instron test device is used and they pull on the wire and note the force it took to break the wire.

    To calculate these forces that will break a material you could do an FEA (finite element analysis) or you could do a simple experiment and measure the forces before breaking etc...

    Descent reading material.

    This is the core business that my company works with everyday.

    My Works Website
    it'll show you a bunch of various products availiable to measure Force or Pressure
     
  16. cointelpro

    cointelpro Senior Member

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    neato. great information! so, before you begin to neck, if the stress is relieved the metal will return to some of its original shape, IE, a once perfect line becomes 1-5 degrees off, but if you keep going it may break or become fucked the hell up, IE perfect line becomes 45 degrees off. correct? and do you know how they would do this test to engine blocks?
     
  17. cws13

    cws13 Senior Member

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    Engine blocks are not rated or tested in this way to the best of my knowledge. The only grading I have ever come across is on bolts. Pills- can they test this on an object wihtout uniform shape?
     
  18. pills_PMD

    pills_PMD Super Moderator

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    typically on an instron machine, a specimen looks like the following:

    [​IMG]

    it will typically fracture in the center where the cross sectional area is weakest.
    then depending on how that shape specimen performed, you can transform its properties to materials of odd shapes and non-uniform cross sectional areas, though the place of greatest stress is at areas where the cross sectional area goes from large to small, like in an I beam where it goes from the horizontal section to the vertical section of the I.
     
  19. cointelpro

    cointelpro Senior Member

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    so.. they dont use this test on engines? some guy told me "b16a2s are the best b16 gen becuase they have the highest tensile strength"
     
  20. pills_PMD

    pills_PMD Super Moderator

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    he sounds like an asshole to me. they are cast aluminum blocks. unless they are alloyed with a higher percentage of carbon or some other hardening material then i am wrong.
     
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