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turbo/compression

Discussion in 'General Tech and Maintenance' started by pbeam27, Jun 4, 2008.

  1. pbeam27

    pbeam27 New Member

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    i have been looking at post and was wondering what it means to building a performance motor with compression instead of doing turbo? :confused:
     
  2. YBLEGAL

    YBLEGAL Regular Member w/ Cheese

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    ? link to what post your talking about. not clear...

    Natural Aspiration = Air is induced thru intake by vacuum, at normal atmospheric pressure.
    Forced Induction = Air is induced thru intake by compression, at multiple to many times atmospheric pressure.

    A turbo is forced induction. A supercharger is forced induction. Each uses it's own technique of compression to force air into the motor.

    You seem to be a little confused. Any clearer?
     
  3. YBLEGAL

    YBLEGAL Regular Member w/ Cheese

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    Oh and I'm thinking you mean, increasing the compression for a naturally aspirated motor. This is to extract more power at the expense of higher octane fuel. With turbo, you generally don't want a compression level as high as a naturally aspirated motor because the air the turbine compresses causes the natural compression of the motor at 1 atmospheric pressure to increase. Read the article about static vs. effective compression in the tech articles for more on that.
     
  4. Ryma

    Ryma Member

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    There was a chap on team integra that built an all motor gsr and got like 270 something to the wheels but hes last I knew he had problems up the wazoo with the idle and headgaskets and a bunch of other stuff. So he tore it apart to get teh problems solved and to do some cosmetic stuff like hiding wires and such.
     
  5. pbeam27

    pbeam27 New Member

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    here is the post that i read

     
  6. YBLEGAL

    YBLEGAL Regular Member w/ Cheese

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    So basicly your refering to the second post I made. When shelling out the money to build a motor, unless you have easy funds to do it multiple times, you should decide on either natural aspiration or forced induction (turbo or supercharger). Because the motor needs to be built accordingly. Going all out boost, you want sleeves, forged pistons, forged rods, high lift short duration cams, etc. With natural aspiration you want high compression and long duration cams.

    cool?
     
  7. pbeam27

    pbeam27 New Member

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    it seems that you get more power out of forced induction

    but yes thanks
     
  8. Matts96HB

    Matts96HB . Moderator VIP

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    I'm not too sure what this topic was asking, but I'll try to answer my best.

    There are two things you need to consider when building a forced induction engine (compression ratio-wise, at least): Static compression, and effective compression. Static is when the engine is just sitting there. Effective compression is the compression ratio when in boost, higher RPM's, etc. The more air you force in the combustion chamber, the higher the effective compression ratio becomes.

    You'll want to consider both, because if you set the static compression too high initially, the effective compression will be too high and you will have serious if not catastrophic problems. Keep this in mind. Alot of people list parts as "10.1:1 compression ratio," remember this will change depending on your setup.
     
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