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Turbo Prep?!?

Discussion in 'HYBRID -> ED-EF / DA' started by cpartain, Nov 21, 2006.

  1. cpartain

    cpartain New Member

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    Need to get some advice on how to setup and prep my car for a turbo. What is a decent turbo to go with that isn't insanely expensive? I still need the car as a daily driver for a little while until I get my second vehicle. I have a 90 Crx Si with a b18a1 from a 91 Acura. I want to keep the transmission becuase of the long gear ratio. I know that I should get the head PnP and thats my plan but I dont really want to go with a Vtec set up right now. My wife just got an Integra that I will play with. What is a good set up for the turbo or is it just easier and less expensive to buy a premade kit for it? I do have basic mechanical skills but havent tackled the journey of installing a turbo. Thanks for the advice and help. ~OnE~
     
  2. spoolin@idle

    spoolin@idle D Series FTL

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    First, always stay away from the ebay turbo's. They are garbage. You can buy brand new off the shelf turbos from cheapturbo.com or atpturbo.com or even full-race sells good turbos. I'd go with something like a T3/T04e. Most sites list the amount of horsepower the turbo supports. I'd start yourself off with a smaller turbo such as a 50 or 57 trim. It'll cost you somewhere around $650 for the turbo itself. Parts are everywhere for all sorts of prices. Just start searching around.
     
  3. cpartain

    cpartain New Member

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    Well I have to say THANKS for that advice because the Ebay Turbo was a possibility LoL. What about the plumbing set ups that they sell off of ebay, the piping, intercooler, etc. Worth it or easier to find else where. I will research the two websites you have listed Thanks Spoolin!
     
  4. spoolin@idle

    spoolin@idle D Series FTL

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    Honestly, one of those piping setups is probably what I'll start off with. Honda engine bay i/c piping setups are rather simplistic. And they are much cheaper than having a shop fab it for you, as well as cheaper than buying an intercooler / hard pipe package from most companies. You could have extra pieces, and you could need more pieces. I recommend picking up some mandrel bends from summit racing as well and doing some mockup. Start out with the ebay piping setup, and get mocked up what you can in order to then figure out what else you need.

    Use nothing but T-bolts on your couplers. You can buy them from atpturbo.com.
     
  5. cpartain

    cpartain New Member

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    Thanks for the info. Another question I had was about injectors? What size is a good size to go with? Also I have heard alot about ARP bolts.. Totally greek to me. Can anyone shed some light on the subject? Last dummy question. I have a fuel cell for the back of my car, whats better in tank or inline fuel pump?? Thanks and sorry for all the pestering questions.
     
  6. spoolin@idle

    spoolin@idle D Series FTL

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    Injectors: depends on how much horsepower you wish to make. go to Injectors and Fuel Supply and scroll down to see the chart provided that compares number of cylinders x horsepower capability x injector lb/hr (cc)

    ARP rod bolts are included with most aftermarket rods, ARP main bolts you will probably want to go with if you are pulling the bottom end apart. ARP head studs are almost a must to ensure that you don't lift the head during a boost project.

    Don't waste time with a fuel cell if you don't need it, which at this point you definitely don't. Once you go with a fuel cell, you have to worry about different plumbing and all sorts of fun issues. I don't like inline fuel pumps as they still rely on the factory in-tank fuel pump and many inline pumps have been known to cause faiure to the factory pump by overworking it. Get yourself a Walbro 255 gal/hr in-tank pump and you are set (with the addition of the right injectors of course).
     
  7. shidao

    shidao New Member

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    A small note about the port and polishing. This is fine as long as it is only done on the exhaust side of the head. I will state reasons for this below. As well as some additional tips....


    1. Make sure to port match on the head where the exhaust maniford mates up. Reason is, port the exit of the head too big, gasket will be in direct flow of hot gasses, over time this will cause failure of the gasket in those locations. Failure will result in material pushed into turbo causing damage you dont want. Only open the exhaust port to match the gasket being used.

    2. Make sure the exhaust manifold itself will be able to utilize the extra flow created by porting, otherwise its like trying to blow through a straw when it should be blowing through a 3/8 hose(used for example). You wont reap much, if any rewards for the work you have done.

    3. if you are going to port the head you might as well install larger valves making sure the machine shop does a 3 angle grind. Reason for this. More air/ fuel = more horsepower, and since the head is already off might a well build the upper end as well. Dont forget make sure the valves are stainless and valve spring pressures are adequate for the job. Might think about installing new cams at this point as well.

    4. Never port and polish the intake runners. You can port but never polish. Reason for this is, if you ever look in any intake manifold they either have grooves or bumps on the inside of them. This is their for two reasons. 1. to help in proper fuel atomization. 2. to keep the fuel from collecting on the walls and coating them. This goes the same for the intake side of a head. Port match as you would for the exhaust side, port to allow more air, but leave it rough, no polishing, otherwise you may not always run into problems and a rough running engine due to improper fuel atomization.

    5. These are what you would call guidelines to ensure that all ends well, take them for what it is, do what you wish.

    I have been building high horse power muscle car engine for years. I have seen what can happen when these rules have not been followed by others on muscle cars. I would think the same would apply to honda motors as well, but I could be wrong.:)
     
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