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Block gards

Discussion in 'Engine Building' started by CRseX84, Jul 18, 2004.

  1. CRseX84

    CRseX84 Senior Member

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    hey can somone clear this up for me... block gards, when do you use them... the look kind thick.. do they realy just sit between the block and the head?? do they realy help when you boost yourcar insted of getin sleeves? thanks for you help..
    Tyler
     
  2. YouKnowWhoIBee

    YouKnowWhoIBee my avatar is better.

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    There is a thread explaining spoon block guards on HS somewhere. Remember the search button is your friend.
     
  3. JDMilan

    JDMilan Senior Member

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    they help keep the sleeves sturdy, but the coolant paths are narrowed significantly,
     
  4. JDMilan

    JDMilan Senior Member

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    also, I would opt to upgrade sleeves instead of the blockguard.
     
  5. E_SolSi

    E_SolSi Member of the 20 nut club Moderator VIP

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  6. StyleTEG

    StyleTEG Senior Member

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    A better alternative would be block posting.

    Which would not create hot spots, would not block the water jackets, and are much much cheaper ;)
     
  7. JDMilan

    JDMilan Senior Member

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    if I am not mistaken an article on Endyn's site was written up on block posting,,,not sure though...any verifications
     
  8. StyleTEG

    StyleTEG Senior Member

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    Yeah, they discuss it in the 2l all motor buildup in the article section. They also sell the threaded posts, made out of the same grade alluminum as honda blocks so they expand and contract the same with heat. I think they run about $20 for a set.
     
  9. JDMilan

    JDMilan Senior Member

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    I still think the better option would be to upgrade the sleeves on hondas, even though the article complemented the extra slots added to the current factory sleeves, but at the same token you can't compare nascar ideals with different concepts.
     
  10. handlebarsfsr

    handlebarsfsr Senior Member

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    you can get a good quality sleeve job for ~800 bucks. concidering that it costs nearly as much to have a motor professionally torn down, block guard/posts installed, and then have it bored/honed, you might as well get a full sleeve. they are vastly superior to any amount of manipulation of the stock sleeves.
     
  11. JDMilan

    JDMilan Senior Member

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  12. StyleTEG

    StyleTEG Senior Member

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    Well with a sleave job you still need to have the motor torn down. Why would it need to be done professionally?

    Granted full sleeving is no doubt the best way to go, in some cases it may be overkill to what a simple DIY blockposting can do. $20 instead of $800...

    Nascar is obviously not the same thing as modifying imports but its the same theory at work, sideloading and giving the load that would be placed on the weak cylinder walls a stronger place to go.
     
  13. handlebarsfsr

    handlebarsfsr Senior Member

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    the professionals are needed on the rebuild, as there arent a whole lot of people who can honestly put together a motor. that costs money. with block posting, you still need to at least hone the bore to get a fresh surface and ensure there are no irregularities and with posting, you dont ahve the ability to overbore the motor anywhere near like that of a full sleeve. and concidering the cost of all the other parts involved in a buildup (pistons, rods, headwork, valvetrain, etc), and the labor to put them all together, saving a few hundred bucks by skimping on sleeves doesnt really make any sense. if you can build your own motors, and your goals are only slightly above what can be achieved on a stock block, go for it. otherwise.. i dont see why you wouldnnt want to sleeve.
     
  14. StyleTEG

    StyleTEG Senior Member

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    I just rebuilt a B18C5 motor, my first time, by reading the helms. Its not that hard, and the tools are not very expensive.

    You can hone yourself, provided the cylinder walls are not out of round. If you don't plan on overboring, and don't plan on running boost, then sleeving is overkill. Its not saving a few hunder bucks, its saving $775 :blink:

    Again, sleeving is no doubt better than just posting. However that doesn't mean there are plenty of setups that there is no need to sleeve when you can simply post. Its beyond simple as long as you have the right epoxy.
     
  15. JDMilan

    JDMilan Senior Member

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    it's all depends on what he plans to do,...

    so if he posts back up what his plans are and budget then I think be can better steer him in the proper way to go..
     
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