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how to time

Discussion in 'HYBRID -> ED-EF / DA' started by minivan, Feb 3, 2004.

  1. minivan

    minivan Junior Member

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    ok i just out a new head on my d16 and i need to know how to get it timed so it will run thanx
     
  2. MikeBergy

    MikeBergy Blah blah blah....

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    Okay, I'm not an expert on the d16 but this is a general way to do the timing. Before you start moving anything around, inquire as to whether the motor is an interference motor. This means that if the valves were open all the way, and the piston was top dead center(TDC), then they would hit each other. I time my integra motor in the following way because it is an interference motor.

    1. Before you first remove the old head, you want to set the #1 piston to TDC. If you have the valve cover off, you will notice that when the crank pulley markings are lined up for TDC, the valves will be fully closed. You will also notice that there is a timing mark on the cam gear, and that mark should be pointing straight up.

    2 If you pulled the head off without doing this, it makes for a little more work but, not much more. Assuming you didn't do step 1, and you have already put the head back on, Turn the crank slowly, so you don't run a piston into a valve on accident. Position the crank so that it is niether TDC nor BDC, but somewhere in the middle of its stroke. This will give you room to turn the camshaft without tapping one of the valves into a piston.

    3. Use a suitable ratched or wrench to turn the camshaft until the timing mark on the gear is pointing straight up. You will note that the valves are closed, i.e. the cam lobes are not pushing on the rocker arms. I am not sure on the d16, but on the b18, there is drilled hole in the camshaft, and a little tab with a hole on the cam holder that line up, and you can stick a screwdriver or something long and roung that keeps the cam from rotating inadvertantly.

    4. Now rotate the crankshaft so that its timing mark is showing TDC. I used a white crayon to make the mark more visible on the pulley, as well as on the timing belt cover.

    5. If you need to replace the water pump, then now is the time to do it, before putting a new timing belt on.

    6. Replace the old timing belt with a new one. Loosening up the timing belt tensioner, expanding it to its widest setting, and tightening it back up for the time being will ease the belt installation.

    7 Slip the belt into place. The engine turns counter clockwise, so any slck in the belt, you will want on the right side of the engine; in otherwords, the side of the engine toward the firewall should have most of the slack.

    8. Loosen the timing belt tensioner pulley again, and allow it to take the slack out of the belt. Tighten the bolt up to lock the pulley in place.

    9. Tighten down the valve cover. Remember to either clean the gasket or replace it with a new one, and use a type of gasket sealer recommended for rubber gaskets. Don't forget to remove the screwdriver that was keeping the camshaft in place (like I said, I am not sure if the d16 has that, so it may not apply to you)

    10. Making sure your timing marks are still correct. The crank pulley and cam gear should both show top dead center. This says that the #1 cylinder is at TDC of its compression stroke.

    11. Make sure you didn't leave any wrenches or anything still attached to the crank pulley. That will mess you up for sure. If everything is put back together correctlt, and the distributor timing is somewhat close, go ahead and start up your motor. Let it run for about 20-30 seconds, and then stop it. Using the little access hole in the timing belt cover, loosen the timing belt tensioner pulley and allow it to take any extra slack that could still have been in the belt. Tighten it back up, warm the engine up, set the ignition timing with a timing light, and you should be good to go.

    This is a general way to set the timing on a honda or any OHC motor that has a motor similar to a honda. DOHC motors have one more cam to set timing marks for, but the method is the same. Any techs that see this post, feel free to comment, and if I have given misinformation, please let me know.
    Mike
     
  3. MikeBergy

    MikeBergy Blah blah blah....

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    And with regards to the ignition timing. After you have set your cam timing to TDC for the number one cylinder, and followed the directions above, and it will not start, it is probably your ignition timing, provided everything else on your motor is in working order. Pull off your distrib. cap, and if the engine is set to TDC for cyl. 1, then the ignition rotor will be lined up with the lead for the #1 cyl. spark plug wire. I think honda made the the distributor idiot proof, so it only goes on one way(lines up with a notch in the end of the camshaft). All you'll have to do is hook up a timing light, if possible, with an advance adjustment knob on it, adjust the knob to the right amount of degrees advance for idle, or what ever you want it to be. Then loosen up the distributor, rotate it the right amount so the timing marks on the crank pulley light up. Then you're good to go.
     
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