1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

RJ11 to RJ45 conversion

Discussion in 'Computers, Games, Electronics etc' started by D16Civic, Oct 1, 2012.

  1. D16Civic

    D16Civic Matt

    Messages:
    1,469
    Likes Received:
    149
    Joined:
    Jun 7, 2007
    Location:
    Chesterfield Twp, MI
    I know there's a couple of networking guys on here. Just upgraded my internet service from old school dsl to att uverse to get a little better speed. My question is can I convert the 40 year old phone wire into the house to cat5? The input on the 2wire modem/router is typical rj11. I've already wall fished and wired up every room in the house with 2 cat 5 jacks apiece into modular wall plates so the tools/materials aren't an issue.

    I guess my question is can I run 4 pair into an rj11 connector and still get service?
     
    Last edited: Oct 3, 2012
  2. phunky.buddha

    phunky.buddha Admin with a big stick Admin VIP

    Messages:
    28,465
    Likes Received:
    228
    Joined:
    Sep 30, 2002
    Location:
    Dallas / Fort Worth, TX
    :no:
     
  3. jamesA

    jamesA Well known pissed off telephone guy VIP

    Messages:
    16,116
    Likes Received:
    1,014
    Joined:
    Aug 10, 2003
    :withstupid: You need a Cat5 cable with an 8 pin RJ45 on both sides terminated straight through.
     
  4. D16Civic

    D16Civic Matt

    Messages:
    1,469
    Likes Received:
    149
    Joined:
    Jun 7, 2007
    Location:
    Chesterfield Twp, MI
    Kinda what I figured anyways. Thanks guys. May just run new 2 pair from the outside box straight to the modem and bypass the 1974 daisy chain.
     
  5. jamesA

    jamesA Well known pissed off telephone guy VIP

    Messages:
    16,116
    Likes Received:
    1,014
    Joined:
    Aug 10, 2003
    Just run everything cat5e. Any updates later on will be easy to switch different plugs on compared to running new lines.
     
  6. D16Civic

    D16Civic Matt

    Messages:
    1,469
    Likes Received:
    149
    Joined:
    Jun 7, 2007
    Location:
    Chesterfield Twp, MI
    Everything is cat5e except the line into the modem. Problem is its a 4 pin plug not an 8 pin.
     
  7. CRX-YEM

    CRX-YEM Super Moderator Moderator VIP

    Messages:
    4,623
    Likes Received:
    54
    Joined:
    Sep 29, 2002
    Location:
    Wallingford, CT
    If you went through all that trouble to run cat5 you should of gone cat6
     
    1 person likes this.
  8. phunky.buddha

    phunky.buddha Admin with a big stick Admin VIP

    Messages:
    28,465
    Likes Received:
    228
    Joined:
    Sep 30, 2002
    Location:
    Dallas / Fort Worth, TX
    Yup. Run the highest grade possible. CAT6 allows higher frequency data transmission that 5E- I think it's 250MHz vs 100MHz. Don't remember exactly.
     
    1 person likes this.
  9. jamesA

    jamesA Well known pissed off telephone guy VIP

    Messages:
    16,116
    Likes Received:
    1,014
    Joined:
    Aug 10, 2003
    You'll get the same speeds off 5e as you would cat6. Of course unless he pays out of the asshole for a badass service at home, he'll never even come close to using all the potential of 5e. It's not worth the cost of cat6 when you can buy 5e for $89 per 1000 ft.
     
  10. jamesA

    jamesA Well known pissed off telephone guy VIP

    Messages:
    16,116
    Likes Received:
    1,014
    Joined:
    Aug 10, 2003
    Also, that's fine. Just use the white blue of the cat5 for the line from the service to the modem.
     
    1 person likes this.
  11. D16Civic

    D16Civic Matt

    Messages:
    1,469
    Likes Received:
    149
    Joined:
    Jun 7, 2007
    Location:
    Chesterfield Twp, MI
    Lol that was my question from the start. Probably poorly worded. So I just put a 4 pin on the cat 5 and fold back the unused pairs?

    Also I went with the 5e cuz it was free from work. I'm not running a massive network or anything. Just smart tvs, xbox 360, etc. Typical wired devices. I just prefer hard wire over wifi if possible. Ran extra ports to all the rooms just because I was already doing the work.

    Appreciate all the replies guys.
     
  12. D16Civic

    D16Civic Matt

    Messages:
    1,469
    Likes Received:
    149
    Joined:
    Jun 7, 2007
    Location:
    Chesterfield Twp, MI
    On a related note, anyone know if I can use my existing wireless router as a switch, basically deactivate the router function. The new modem has the router built into it. I already have an 8 port switch in use, figured I could maybe use this in addition. If not I'll just stick it in the closet in the basement for future use.

    Thanks in advance.
     
  13. reikoshea

    reikoshea HS Troll...And Mod Moderator VIP

    Messages:
    12,633
    Likes Received:
    193
    Joined:
    Apr 27, 2005
    Location:
    San Antonio, TX
    Yes, you can use 2 of the pairs from a cat5 drop to wire an rj11 socket on both sides.

    Done it in 2 different houses now, works great. Also gives you the option to use that plug for central networking in the future.
     
    1 person likes this.
  14. D16Civic

    D16Civic Matt

    Messages:
    1,469
    Likes Received:
    149
    Joined:
    Jun 7, 2007
    Location:
    Chesterfield Twp, MI
    I could probably strip the old 2 pair back to find out, but what's the wiring sequence?

    I assume w/b - b, w/o-o but not positive.

    edit, rep for everyone!!!!
     
  15. reikoshea

    reikoshea HS Troll...And Mod Moderator VIP

    Messages:
    12,633
    Likes Received:
    193
    Joined:
    Apr 27, 2005
    Location:
    San Antonio, TX
    doesn't matter on rj11. Just use the same color pairs, dont use white-brown+blue+orange+white-green

    I wired all my RJ-11 jacks: white-orange+blue+white-blue+orange, white-brown+green+white-green+brown

    Both jacks worked wired that way. But im sure it would work no matter how you ran it, since RJ-11 is used for analog signal and you dont have to worry about cross talk.
     
  16. jamesA

    jamesA Well known pissed off telephone guy VIP

    Messages:
    16,116
    Likes Received:
    1,014
    Joined:
    Aug 10, 2003
    Yeah you can turn off the DHCP in the router and it'll act as a switch. Every router setup is different, so I can't tell you how specifically to get into the router to turn it off. Once you find out what the gateway IP is, just plug that number into a browser address bar and a screen with the username/password should show up. (IE: Netgear/Linksys gateway IP addresses are by default 192.168.1.1, DLink are usually 192.168.0.1, etc.)

    The standard way for doing a straight through C5e/C6 cable is as follows from left to right:

    white orange
    orange
    white green
    blue
    white blue
    green
    white brown
    brown

    It honestly doesn't matter what order the colors are in, just as long as they're the same on both sides, but if you ever have anyone who knows what they're doing look at your wiring, just do your RJ45s in that fashion to save them the trouble of having to hack you into little pieces and dig little holes around the city to bury you. Trust me. It can be that frustrating to try to fix someone elses non-standard wiring issues when you weren't there to begin with.

    On the RJ11 just make sure the pair you're using for an analog line is in the center two pins. Most RJ11s are either 2, 4, or 6 pin layouts, as long as the pair you want to use goes in the center of those pins it'll work.

    Edit: so the wiring sequence should work like this (if you want to do it the right way) from left to right:

    white orange
    blue
    white blue
    orange

    With the blue and white blue in the center two pins as such on BOTH ENDS of the wire, it'll work. Wiring any color combination so they match on both ends will work as recked explained.
     
    Last edited: Oct 3, 2012
  17. D16Civic

    D16Civic Matt

    Messages:
    1,469
    Likes Received:
    149
    Joined:
    Jun 7, 2007
    Location:
    Chesterfield Twp, MI
    Thanks guys. All my RJ 45 is to spec as far as wiring sequence. Kind of hard to screw up when it's on the crimp tool. I've done 2 pair on the punch down modular jacks before but never into the male end connector so that was my main question. The outdoor connections are easy as it's just matching what is already in place.

    Thanks again for everything. Probably won't fuck with it till Sunday or Monday as I'll be working the next few days.
     
  18. CRX-YEM

    CRX-YEM Super Moderator Moderator VIP

    Messages:
    4,623
    Likes Received:
    54
    Joined:
    Sep 29, 2002
    Location:
    Wallingford, CT
    it would highly benefit on his local LAN and as network speeds increase and we see gigabit connections from our ISP's he wouldn't have to redo all that work.
     
  19. phunky.buddha

    phunky.buddha Admin with a big stick Admin VIP

    Messages:
    28,465
    Likes Received:
    228
    Joined:
    Sep 30, 2002
    Location:
    Dallas / Fort Worth, TX
    I've been seeing almost the same prices for 6 vs 5e. Just pays to wire up with the best you can get for now in preparation for higher data speeds, especially since the house will be along longer than it takes speeds to exceed 5e.
     
  20. jamesA

    jamesA Well known pissed off telephone guy VIP

    Messages:
    16,116
    Likes Received:
    1,014
    Joined:
    Aug 10, 2003
    5e will handle gigabit connections. It's what it was designed for. What he has will work for him considering he got the wire for free. lol
     
Verification:
Draft saved Draft deleted

Share This Page