new to the carbon fiber game

We may earn a small commission from affiliate links and paid advertisements. Terms

ok guys just got my first real carbon fiber product it is a VIS carbon fiber hood and i wanted to know what kind of special care do i have to do? wax it? i can use my regular soap to clean it? windex it? let me know
 
I think it should be clear coated or painted. then treat it as though it was a sheet metal peice with paint.

If it is already cleared. then trreat it as it is paint.

You could always wet sand it w/ 1200 or 1400 grit paper make it look that much better.
 
Never wash anything that has paint/clear coat/resin/ whatever on it with windex.
 

reikoshea

Moderator
VIP
Originally posted by phyregod@Jul 23 2005, 02:44 PM
Never wash anything that has paint/clear coat/resin/ whatever on it with windex.
[post=530212]Quoted post[/post]​


What so everytime ive washed my car (painted) i was wrong?
 
Originally posted by VTECPOWER@Jul 23 2005, 02:59 PM
He said with windex.
Reading > You
[post=530235]Quoted post[/post]​


My dad uses windex to get the bugs off the front of his car. Never had a problem with it, but it's not something I'd do.
 
I use windex on the really tough stains.. and to get the oil and dirt and shit off my hubcaps..

besides.. why buy carbon fiber? in a few more years carbon carbon will be out and it is like way better than carbon fiber..
 
Originally posted by Lantis@Jul 25 2005, 02:24 AM
I use windex on the really tough stains.. and to get the oil and dirt and shit off my hubcaps..

besides.. why buy carbon fiber? in a few more years carbon carbon will be out and it is like way better than carbon fiber..
[post=530652]Quoted post[/post]​

carbon carbon got any links on that?
 
Originally posted by Lantis@Jul 24 2005, 11:24 PM
why buy carbon fiber? in a few more years carbon carbon will be out and it is like way better than carbon fiber..
[post=530652]Quoted post[/post]​

Because who wants to wait a few more years to pay more money for something that will look almost the exact same!?!?!
 
because carbon carbon is the roxxorz..

and no I don't think there are any links to carbon carbon.. especially since at the moment the only people using it are NASA..
 
I'm going to go hang out near the Indy dumpsters... They'll be like.. so what if we paid $30,000 for this spoiler! its carbon fiber and that is old shit! Besides, we have 18 of the Carbon Carbon spoilers!
 
REINFORCED CARBON-CARBON

RCC fabrication begins with a rayon cloth graphitized and impregnated with a phenolic resin. This impregnated cloth is layed up as a laminate and cured in an autoclave. After being cured, the laminate is pyrolized to convert the resin to carbon. This is then impregnated with furfural alcohol in a vacuum chamber, then cured and pyrolized again to convert the furfural alcohol to carbon. This process is repeated three times until the desired carbon-carbon properties are achieved.

To provide oxidation resistance for reuse capability, the outer layers of the RCC are converted to silicon carbide. The RCC is packed in a retort with a dry pack material made up of a mixture of alumina, silicon and silicon carbide. The retort is placed in a furnace, and the coating conversion process takes place in argon with a stepped-time-temperature cycle up to 3,200 F. A diffusion reaction occurs between the dry pack and carbon-carbon in which the outer layers of the carbon-carbon are converted to silicon carbide (whitish-gray color) with no thickness increase. It is this silicon-carbide coating that protects the carbon-carbon from oxidation. The silicon-carbide coating develops surface cracks caused by differential thermal expansion mismatch, requiring further oxidation resistance. That is provided by impregnation of a coated RCC part with tetraethyl orthosilicate. The part is then sealed with a glossy overcoat. The RCC laminate is superior to a sandwich design because it is light in weight and rugged; and it promotes internal cross-radiation from the hot stagnation region to cooler areas, thus reducing stagnation temperatures and thermal gradients around the leading edge. The operating range of RCC is from minus 250 F to about 3,000 F. The RCC is highly resistant to fatigue loading that is experienced during ascent and entry.


They are using it on the nose and leading edges of the wings of the shuttle.. Its heat deflection material.


***PS***
I also read that it "lacks impact resistance"

This was proven by the 2003 shuttle that blew to bits over texas. A chunk o insulation hit the wing's leading edge (made of carbon-carbon) and broke it.
 
Top