One Wheel Wonder

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Wagz

Junior Member
I know that on my old accord ( 90 lx ) only one of the front wheels was getin power at any one time. I am not totally new to this, but what do i need to do to get both wheels spinin on my civic hb? Dual drive shafts?? Any help is appreciated..

I'm not sure if this sound dumb to someone who knows his sh*t...but anything would help me out. :blink:
 

chevy302dz

Senior Member
You need a limited slip differential. What you have now is called a open differential the way it works is when you do a burnout or get stuck in mud or snow sends all availible power to the wheel that has the least resistance and none to the other wheel. Now a limited slip as clutches in it which will allow some power to be transmitted to the other wheel giving you better traction.
 

posol

RETIRED
Staff member
no, not at all nate.

lockers lock the driveline. a LSD will not lock both wheels together- it feels which one is slipping and gives less power to it
 

exhacker

Member
Originally posted by chevy302dz@Jan 22 2003, 05:19 AM
You need a limited slip differential. What you have now is called a open differential the way it works is when you do a burnout or get stuck in mud or snow sends all availible power to the wheel that has the least resistance and none to the other wheel. Now a limited slip as clutches in it which will allow some power to be transmitted to the other wheel giving you better traction.

Please see my Poll About LSD's

A limited slip differential can be either gear-type or clutch-type. The gear type (Quaife or Torsen) is more expensive, but usually requires little to no maintainance. The clutch-type (OPM Motorsports or Mugen) offers a customizeable setting known as initial slip, and this has to do with the angles inside the differential, as well as the number of pressure plates (clutches) you have inside the LSD... usually between 12 and 16 plates. The initial slip is most useful for situations where you want the LSD to engage early in the curve. The gear-type LSD's will wait until slip is detected (one wheel spinning fast and getting all the torque, the other decelerating or holding still) and then engage with what some call a "lock". You will feel an LSD engage at the limits of the car's handling in a turn, but the characteristics vary. Some will let the back of the car swing around before engaging, but then let you power out of the turn. Others will lock going into the turn, and let you hold your line by hitting the accelerator if you start to push out of the turn (sounds scary, and it probably is).

Then, with clutch-type LSD's (especially Mugen's LSD) there is a choice to be made with either 1-way, 1.5-way, or 2-way. I'm not totally clear on the differences, but the 2-way will engage the LSD during acceleration AND deceleration. I think it's the 1.5-way that will not slip during acceleration, but will ignore slip when you let off the throttle. I guess this would be a driving style preference, and also probably depend on the surface/tyre choice.

If someone wants to expound on LSD's, or correct me about anything, please do so. I'm looking to add an LSD to my B18B/5th Gen Coupe sometime this year. Can't wait :spin:

-x
 

asmallsol

Super Moderator
Originally posted by exhacker@Jan 22 2003, 10:24 AM
Then, with clutch-type LSD's (especially Mugen's LSD) there is a choice to be made with either 1-way, 1.5-way, or 2-way. I'm not totally clear on the differences, but the 2-way will engage the LSD during acceleration AND deceleration. I think it's the 1.5-way that will not slip during acceleration, but will ignore slip when you let off the throttle. I guess this would be a driving style preference, and also probably depend on the surface/tyre choice.

I thought that the 1 way work under accleration, 1.5 way works with both accel and deacceleration, and 2 way works all the time.
 

exhacker

Member
Originally posted by asmallsol@Jan 22 2003, 01:56 PM
I thought that the 1 way work under accleration, 1.5 way works with both accel and deacceleration, and 2 way works all the time.

:withstupid: Thanks for the correction. They don't explain LSD's very well when they sell them.

Do LSD's make you lose power... in other words, is some power spent turning the LSD, > 1 ft lb ? If so, it seems like the 2-way would be the worst for power loss, creating a "drag" at cruise. Thanks for the info, gals & guys!

:worthy: HONDASWAP.COM
 

asmallsol

Super Moderator
yea i have no idea about power loss, the only reason why I know what lsd does what is because brian (pissedoffsol) explained it to me, this site teaches you so much
 

gtpilot

Member
I have raced both types of differentials and they do have different characteristcs...

The clutch type (Mugen in this case) suffers a little bit at initial turn in as the front end wants to push just slightly. Mid-turn to track out while on the throttle is very stable, you can steer with the amount of throttle input you give it.

The gear type (Quaife in this case), I favored for turn in as it is running free at initial turn in, but when you get back on the throttle it has a tendancy to spool the power back and forth between the front wheels trying to find equilibrium...it is a little disconscerting, but you get used to it.

They both are very welcomed additions over an open differential, you just have to drive them a little different in race applications.

Kirk
 

tdehnel

Senior Member
Do the clutch type diffs require mutch maintainence? I heard from many people that the Kaaz clutch type LSDs need to be serviced every 30,000 miles or so. If so, the gear type seems like the obvious choice, right?
 
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