machinest lend me ur ears!

22crazy

Senior Member
Whats up. I have a metal shop with a milling machine ( with boring capablity) and a lathe. I was wondering what is involved in boring an engine and resleaving it. I would really appreaciate it.
 

Canuck 93 Civic Si

Senior Member
Im not completely sure but i think the existing sleves are removed, the holes for the sleves enlarged ( if necessary ) and a new sleeve installed by cooling it alot and pressing it in place. You could of course just set your block up on you mill and bore it out a little, maybe 20 thou. That is a little more common.
 

22crazy

Senior Member
if i were to bore the stock sleeve...it will become weaker because it isnt as thick....will this have a dramatic effect if im going to boost the motor?
 

22crazy

Senior Member
one question....how do u remove the sleeve? can u just bored out the whole sleeve and sum of the outter wall so i can have a larger bore when i resleeve or is there an easier way
 

posol

RETIRED
Staff member
i HIGHLY suggest you get it done professionally.

you CAN'T half ass it with boost. you will blow up. you CAN'T be cheap and try to cut corners by doing some things yourself that other people/manufacters are pros at.
 
trust me mate get the pros to do it ive been machining for 4-5 years and have got to know a lot about doing
these things it aint worth trying to do it on your own you would fuck it up i know people who r the ultimate kings at machining and they have fucked it up it takes time and experience thats why the costs are high
 

22crazy

Senior Member
the thing is that i have an uncle with 45 years experience on manufacturating with milling machine and laythes. What he needs is a schematic of the engine block with the tolerances and surface finshes for the block. (the layer after the sleeve)
 

chevy302dz

Senior Member
You would need to bulid a fixture to hold the block, you would also be required to invest in the tooling for the actual machining operations, if your miller is not set up to spray coolant you destroy any surface you try to machine. So on and so forth. It's not only safer to have a shop do the work it's cheaper.
 
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