Swap Info for EF (4th Gen) Civic and CRX

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EF Swap Guide​

Original: Ben Ogle
(Updated and fixed bad links by HondaSwap.com Staff]

So you have an EF/ED. Chances are that it is slow, especially if you ended up with a DX, LX, STD or some other long-geared, gas-saving, dual point model. So this guide is here to help you decide how you want to make faster without the aid of forced induction (well, you can go that route too but its not covered). If you are a newbie read EVERYTHING here. That way you will spend less time asking questions on message boards. Also, I didn't feel like reiterating everything in every specific motor section so read at least the first few before you scroll down to the motor you want to get.

B-series​


These are by far the most popular swaps. They are fairly easy for the average joe to do and are pretty fast right out of the box. But in doing a b-series swap you WILL need to do some things in order for this swap to work:

-Get some mounts. I like Hasports as do many others but Place Racing, HCP, and some others make them as well. NOTE: the B16 JRSC fits with Place Racing mounts in the EF chassis. I have done it. I don't know about the other mount kits. If you know, please tell me.

-You have to either find EF SiR shift linkage or you can shorten 90-93 integra shift linkage by 2-3" . I do the latter because DA linkage is easy to find and its cheap. I also always shorten it in the straightest portion possible. The 3rd option is to get some adjustable shift linkage From Hasport or Place Racing.

-You need (maybe not NEED) a tranny that has a Cable actuated clutch. This will be covered on a case by case basis in the motor portion of this guide.

-If you have a Dual-Point car you will NEED to convert it to Multi-Point. If you are going the VTEC route you will need to wire the VTEC stuff in all EFs no matter the trim level.

-MPFI wiring: DPFI to MPFI writeup

-VTEC wiring; wires to add if using PR3/PW0 ECU:

  • Pin A8 - VTEC solenoid
  • Pin B5 - VTEC oil pressure switch (plug with 2 wires, Black is ground)
  • Pin B19 - Knock sensor
  • Pin C8 - Second oxygen sensor

-Get some 90-93 integra axles, JDM EF SiR axles (good luck finding them if they didn't come with your swap) or get custom ones. You need to have a 90-93 teg intermediate shaft with the teg axles and an SiR int shaft with the SiR axles. If you get customs ones ask the manufacturer of the axles which intermediate shaft you should use.

-If using 90-93 axles, take out the dust rings on your knuckles. Also take off the dust rings on the axles. It sucks but you pretty much need the clearance for the axles. Try to stay out of the dirt.

-You need a 90-93 integra throttle cable (except if you are going JRSC, then you can use the stock one).

-You need to make a large dent in the frame rail right below the shock tower (right under the rectangular hole). This dent clears the alternator pulley. NOTE: if you're putting a JRSC in this dent will NEED to be further forward and a lot deeper. Trust me. Experience talking. We pulled the motor a few times messing with this.

-Your stock exhaust probably wont bolt up (if it does you are lucky). If you are using a stock exhaust manifold on the b-series then you can use you stock D-series down pipe on the b-series manifold. But what you really should do is get rid of the stock manifold, buy a header, and get some 2.25" exhaust made at a muffler shop. Or you could buy an aftermarket cat-back exhaust and get it modified to fit. Either way you WILL want to get rid of that 1.5" crush bent stock crap and the stock header/downpipe.

ECU pin outs are here: ECU Pinouts

I know this sounds like a lot of stuff but it really isn't when you get down to it.

D-series​


Your car comes stock with a d-series engine. These bolt right in without mount kits. You can use your stock shift linkage, axles, mounts, and even the tranny if you want (you'll want to find an Si one).

H-series​


A few people have done it and IMO its not worth the effort unless its going into an 88 CRX Hf (1819lbs stock) and even then it would be a huge pain. If you want an H-series buy an early low-model EG hatch. Your time will be better spent and the cars aren't all that much heavier than a low model EF. If you are learning a lot by what you are reading right now this is NOT the swap for you. It can and has been done, but it's a lot of customization and frustration.

Now, on with the engines. If you are new to Honda Engines, take a look at the Honda Engines List page first.


B-series VTEC Engines​


ODB0 JDM B16​


Engine: 1988-1991 JDM B16A
Displacement: 1595cc
Compression Ratio: 10.2:1
Rod/stroke ratio: 1.74
Hp/Torque: 160hp@7600rpm/112lb-ft@7000rpm
Transmission: JDM S1, J1, Y1, A1 (cable)
OBD: 0
ECU: integra motor - PR3, Civic motor - PW0. But the motor can be run with a PR4 and an RPM switch or a PS9 with DaveB's wonderful one-wire VTEC chip (PM6's can be converted too).

This is one of the easiest B-series swaps to do (and the most common). You can get full swaps for $1200-1600 depending on where you get it from and if you get any special stuff with it (like, for instance the LSD tranny which is a GREAT thing to get). If you can, try to get a motor from an EF SiR. That way you get the axles and shift linkage that were made for your car. It goes in like butta. But if you get an integra motor those are ok too. The shift linkage will need to be shortened and the axles will work. The car will need to be wired for only VTEC if you have an Si, Hf, or EX. If you have an LX, DX, STD or another dual point car I forgot then the car will have to be wired for multipoint as well.

For Multipoint wiring go here: DPFI to MPFI writeup. For VTEC wiring I just make my own harness from other harnesses I have laying around (or from the one that came with the swap). I run a plug from the ECU to the passenger side plug holder (there is already a spot for it!) and then run the other side of the plug to all the VTEC sensors.

With the motor, the tranny supplied is great. The only problem with b16 trannies is the 3rd gear grinds. They are tough to find without.

Stock B16 EF's typically run high 14s to low 15s down the drag strip. Pretty damn good for a 1.6 liter.

ODB1 JDM B16​


Engine: 1992-up JDM B16A
Displacement: 1595cc
Compression Ratio: 10.4:1
Rod/stroke ratio: 1.74
Hp/Torque: 170hp@7800rpm/116lb-ft@7300
Transmission: Y21, S4C (hydraulic)
OBD: 1
ECU: P30

This is roughly the same motor as above but out of a 92-95 civic SIR (with higher compression) and updated for OBD1 electronics, so the motor will be, of course, newer. These go for $1500-$2000. The problems are with the OBD1 and the hydraulic clutch trannies and because of these problems they really aren't a great choice for our generation civics.

The OBD problem:

Your car is OBD0 and this motor is OBD1. Almost all of the wiring is different. So you can convert the motor to obd0 by installing a 1g b16 distributor, getting an OBD0 VTEC ECU, and getting a whole bunch of OBD0 sensors (or putting OBD1 plugs on your OBD0 harness). You can utilize the OBD 1 injectors if you don't use an injector resistor box.

The other option is to convert your whole car to OBD1. There is a lot of info available in this thread: Converting from OBD0 to OBD1
work involved. A great resource that is now offline from http://www.geocities.com/kurtsi_on/page7.html (broken link) has been saved! This article focuses on the D16Z6 but it does contain the obd1 conversion information.

This conversion to an 89 CRX Si.

List of the parts used/modified:

1. One slightly used 89 CRX Si
2. 93 D16Z6 (further known as Z6) 1.6L SOHC VTEC
3. Partial engine harness from the 93 D16Z6 and harness parts from a 92 Civic DX auto
4. 95 Civic EX P28 ECU (manual)
5. 92 Civic Si distributor
6. #4107 fuel injectors years unknown (will remark more on this later)

Remarks on installing the D16Z6 itself.

Installing a Z6 itself is pretty close to dropping a D16A6 (a.k.a.A6) engine in. Alterations that need to be made include:

1. Replacement of the Z6 driver side engine mount with the one from the A6. The A6 mount has an "extra" piece that wraps around from the front of the engine, it is shaped like an "L". This "L" piece is not needed and for that matter, doesn’t quite fit on the Z6 (wrong angle). In order to get the timing belt covers to fit over the A6 mount, some cutting of the bottom cover is required.

2. The crankshaft pulley that should be used on the Z6 is the one for the Z6. The reason for this is that pulley is balanced for the Z6. The A6 pulley will fit but there is the potential for premature crankshaft bearing wear due to it not being balanced for the Z6. The belts on the Z6 pulley are of a different groove number then the AC and alternator belts off the A6, but it doesn’t seem to matter so long as the belts are tensioned properly. As for accessory over/under turning, no problems have been experienced in the almost 10000 miles put on the car since the swap.

3. Both the intake and exhaust manifolds used were from the Z6.

The intake is ported specifically for the engine therefore logically it is best that it is used for the engine (as opposed to the A6 intake manifold). Slight modifications had to be made to the engine harness by transplanting some of the plugs off the 93 engine harness onto the 89 harness so that the intake sensors could be plugged in. Since the MAP sensor on the Z6 (93-95) is on top of the throttle body, it is necessary to extend the wires for the MAP sensor plug from the 88-91 location on the firewall to the top of the throttle body.

The Z6 exhaust manifold is a 2-piece 4-2-1 design as opposed to the 2-piece 4-1 A6 manifold. The A6 4-1 fits the Z6, but there is no reason to use it as opposed to the Z6 4-2-1.

4. Clutch, pressure plate and flywheel…The 90+ setups have a wider surface area then the 88-89 therefore offering more contact area and thus more effective power transfer. The Z6 with stock clutch, pressure plate and flywheel will bolt directly onto 89+ year transmissions. It will not bolt directly onto an 88 transmission unless the proper 88 clutch, pressure plate and flywheel are used (due to the 88s having a different spline count on the input shaft). 92+ transmissions can’t be used due to them being hydraulically activated, and the mount positions on the 92+ transmission being different then the ones on the 88-91 transmissions.

5. The A6 alternator and AC compressor mounts bolt right onto the Z6 thus allowing the use of the A6 alternator and AC compressors.

6. The location of the coolant temperature sensor is on the back of the block for the 88-92 engines (88-91 A6 and 92 Z6) thus if a 92 Z6 is used, no relocation of the wiring for it is required. On the 93-95 Z6, the temperature sensor is on the thermostat cover thus the wiring for it will need to be relocated.

These steps will get the Z6 into the car. If it is decided at this point to use stock CRX Si (A6) electronics, these steps will have to be followed:

1. Modification of the distributor mounts is necessary. Only the top and front mount legs on the A6 distributor will be used, as the rear mount does not match up to the bolt-in location on the Z6 head. Both of the legs on the distributor will need to be modified (cut or enlarged) so as to get the timing correct. Large washers will most likely be needed to make sure positive contact with the head is made. Make sure to put a new o-ring on the distributor where it goes into the head to prevent oil leakage. It is also necessary to use Z6 sparkplug wires.

2. As for fuel injectors, you must use the A6 fuel injectors with the A6 computer (PM6). To do this, simply replace the Z6 injectors with the A6 injectors. Here is another place new o-rings are necessary. The green o-rings on the fuel injectors should be replaced in order to avoid gasoline being forced out around the tops of the injectors, thus creating a fire hazard.

3. In order to use the VTEC, it is necessary to wire some kind of activation switch for it. Various methods can be used. For example an RPM activation switch or an adjustable shift light. Use of a Zdyne One-Wire VTEC conversion ECU is highly recommended to ease this process. It will give enriched fuel curves for proper VTEC operation as well as allowing a user defined VTEC activation point and other features.

At this point, the engine will run like an A6 but will be VTEC capable assuming an activation switch has been wired up.


The transmission problem:

Your car uses a Cable actuated clutch. The tranny is meant to go in a car with a hydraulic actuated clutch. There are kits available to use the hydro trannies in cable cars. I'm pretty sure the Hasport one is out now so you can check out their site https://www.hasport.com.

The easier path is to sell the hydro tranny (which go for quite a bit more than cable trannies) and buy a B16 cable tranny. Expect to pay around $300 for a non LSD one and about $600 if you can find an LSD one.

USDM B16​


Engine: 1993-1995 USDM B16A2/3
Displacement: 1595cc
Compression Ratio: 10.2:1
Rod/stroke ratio: 1.74
Hp/Torque: 160hp@7600rpm/112lb-ft@7000
Transmission: Y21 (hydraulic)
OBD: 1
ECU: P30

This motor came out of the 94-95 Del Sol VTECs and is the same as above but with lower compression and weaker fuel/ignition maps in the ECU.


Engine: 1996-1997 & 1999-2000 USDM B16A
Displacement: 1595cc
Compression Ratio: 10.2:1
Rod/stroke ratio: 1.74
Hp/Torque: 160hp@7600rpm/112lb-ft@7000
Transmission: S4C (hydraulic)
OBD: 2
ECU: 99-00 - P2T

The 96-97 motors came out of DelSol VTECs, and the 99-00 motors came from Civic Si's. These are going to be expensive if you can find one. The same stuff from the OBD1 motor applies.

The OBD problem:

Your car is OBD0 (or non-OBD if you are anal) and this motor is OBD2. All of the wiring is different. You can convert the motor to obd0 by installing a 1g b16 distributor, getting an OBD0 VTEC ECU, and getting a whole bunch of OBD0 sensors (or putting OBD2 plugs on your OBD0 harness). You can use the OBD 2 injectors if you don't use an injector resistor box.

You're not going to want to convert the car to OBD2. If you really want to convert the car to a different OBD, go to OBD1. Then you will still have to convert the motor to OBD 1 but that's not as hard as going from OBD1 - 0 or OBD 2 - 0.

The transmission problem:

Your car uses a Cable actuated clutch. The tranny is meant to go in a car with a hydraulic actuated clutch. There are kits available to use the hydro trannies in cable cars. I'm pretty sure the Hasport one is out now so you can check out their site https://www.hasport.com.

The easier path is to sell the hydro tranny (which go for quite a bit more than cable trannies) and buy a B16 cable tranny. Expect to pay around $300 for a non LSD one and about $600 if you can find an LSD one.

ODB1 USDM B17​


Engine: 1992-1993 USDM B17A1
Displacement: 1678cc
Compression Ratio: 9.7:1
Rod/stroke ratio: 1.68
Hp/Torque: 160hp@7600rpm/117lb-ft@7000
Transmission: YS1 (short geared cable)
OBD: 1
ECU: P61 (pretty much a P30)

This motor came ONLY in 92-93 Integra GS-R's. It is essentially a stroked B16 with low compression. The B17 and B16 blocks are the same in all aspects except the block stamp. The difference is in the crank, rods, and pistons (lower comp). The b17 cams are also better than the 88-97 b16 cams. These are great motors but are a tad hard to find and the price varies a ton. If you can, try and get one with a stock GS-R tranny. It is one of the shortest geared ones out there and it's a cable tranny(!). Unfortunately they only came in OBD1 so again you have some choices

The OBD problem:

Your car is OBD0 and this motor is OBD1. Almost all of the wiring is different. So you can convert the motor to obd0 by installing a 1g b16 distributor, getting an OBD0 VTEC ECU, and getting a whole bunch of OBD0 sensors (or putting OBD1 plugs on your OBD0 harness). You can utilize the OBD 1 injectors if you don't use an injector resistor box. If you get a PW0 or PR3 I would suggest getting it chipped for the displacement increased. This is of course not as good as dyno tuning but it helps.

The other option is to convert your whole car to OBD1. There is a lot of work involved. See the above quoted text in the B16 section from kurtsi_on.

ODB1 USDM B18C​


Engine: 1994-1995 USDM B18C1
Displacement: 1797cc
Compression Ratio: 10.0:1
Rod/stroke ratio: 1.58
Hp/Torque: 170hp@7600rpm/128lb-ft@6200
Transmission: Y80 (hydraulic)
OBD: 1
ECU: P72

This motor is out of a 94-95 GS-R. It does not share too many components with the B16. It has, among other things, a different head (p72 as opposed to pr3), more aggressive cams, and a taller block. It also has a "Dual Runner" intake manifold. But like most the others this motor is OBD1 and hydro tranny equipped. Expect to pay around $3200 for the whole swap.

The OBD problem:

Your car is OBD0 (or non-OBD if you are anal) and this motor is OBD1. Almost all of the wiring is different. So you can convert the motor to obd0 by installing a 1g b16 distributor, getting an OBD0 VTEC ECU, and getting a whole bunch of OBD0 sensors (or putting OBD1 plugs on your OBD0 harness). If you go this route you will have to get rid of the dual runner intake manifold by buying a skunk2 manifold. The OBD0 VTEC ECUs don't support the dual runners. Again, you can utilize the OBD 1 injectors if you don't use an injector resistor box. If you get a PW0 or PR3 I would suggest getting it chipped for the displacement increased. This is of course not as good as dyno tuning but it helps.

The other option is to convert your whole car to OBD1. See the quoted text above from kurtsi_on.

The transmission problem:

Your car uses a Cable actuated clutch. The tranny is meant to go in a car with a hydraulic actuated clutch. There are kits available to use the hydro trannies in cable cars. I'm pretty sure the Hasport one is out now so you can check out their site https://www.hasport.com .

The easier path is to sell the hydro tranny (which go for quite a bit more than cable trannies) and buy a B16 cable tranny. Expect to pay around $300 for a non LSD one and about $600 if you can find an LSD one.

ODB2 USDM B18C​


Engine: 1996-up USDM B18C1
Displacement: 1797cc
Compression Ratio: 10.0:1
Rod/stroke ratio: 1.58
Hp/Torque: 170hp@7600rpm/128lb-ft@6200
Transmission: Y80 (hydraulic)
OBD: 2
ECU: P72

This is the OBD2 version of the above motor and it came in 96-01 GS-R's. Other than the wiring it is the same as above. Expect to pay around $3000-$4000 for the whole swap.

The OBD problem:

Your car is OBD0 and this motor is OBD2. All of the wiring is different. You can convert the motor to obd0 by installing a 1g b16 distributor, getting an OBD0 VTEC ECU, and getting a whole bunch of OBD0 sensors (or putting OBD2 plugs on your OBD0 harness). If you go this route you will have to get rid of the dual runner intake manifold by buying a skunk2 manifold. The OBD0 VTEC ECUs don't support the dual runners. Again, you can utilize the OBD 2 injectors if you don't use an injector resistor box. If you get a PW0 or PR3 I would suggest getting it chipped for the displacement increased. This is of course not as good as dyno tuning but it helps.

You're not going to want to convert the car to OBD2. If you really want to convert the car to a different OBD, go to OBD1. Then you will still have to convert the motor to OBD 1 but that's not as hard as going from OBD1 - 0 or OBD 2 - 0.

The transmission problem:

Your car uses a Cable actuated clutch. The tranny is meant to go in a car with a hydraulic actuated clutch. There are kits available to use the hydro trannies in cable cars. Hasport now makes a mount kit with hydro-cable conversion pieces and the special hydro tranny mount. Check out their site https://www.hasport.com.

The other path is to sell the hydro tranny (which go for quite a bit more than cable trannies) and buy a B16 cable tranny. Expect to pay around $300 for a non LSD one and about $600 if you can find an LSD one.

ODB2 JDM B18C​


Engine: 1996-up JDM B18C
Displacement: 1797cc
Compression Ratio: 10.6:1
Rod/stroke ratio: 1.58
Hp/Torque: 180hp@7600rpm/129lb-ft@6200
Transmission: Y80, S80 (hydraulic/optional LSD)
OBD: 2
ECU: P72

Same motor as the 96+ USDM motor but with higher compression and an optional LSD tranny. These motors are probably easier to find than the USDM motors because you can get them from one of the many engine importers. Expect to pay around $3200 for the whole swap. Other than that see the USDM 96+ B18C listing above.

ODB2 JDM B16B​


Engine: 1997-up JDM B16B
Displacement: 1595cc
Compression Ratio: 10.8:1
Rod/stroke ratio: 1.77
Hp/Torque: 185hp@8200rpm/118lb-ft@7500
Transmission: S80 w/ LSD (hydraulic)
OBD: 2
ECU: PCT

The B16B is a one of a kind Honda 1.6liter. It came from the JDM Civic Type R and shares a block with the Integra Type R B18C5 but has a shorter stoke and longer rods giving it that rev-happy 1.77 rod stroke ratio (highest of all the B-series motors). B16B's also have more aggressive cams than even the B18C5/R motors. These motors are fairly rare and very rarely swapped into anything. This is probably because they go for around $3800 (whole swap). That's $600 more than the JDM B18C1 which has only 5hp less and 10lb-ft more torque (at lower RPM, too).

The OBD problem:

This motor is OBD2. All of the wiring is different. You can convert the motor to obd0 by installing a 1g b16 distributor (OBD0 B18a dist will work with modification), getting an OBD0 VTEC ECU, and getting a whole bunch of OBD0 sensors (or putting OBD2 plugs on your OBD0 harness). You can utilize the OBD 2 injectors if you don't use an injector resistor box.

You're not going to want to convert the car to OBD2. If you really want to convert the car to a different OBD, go to OBD1. Then you will still have to convert the motor to OBD 1 but that's not as hard as going from OBD1 - 0 or OBD 2 - 0.

The tranny problem:

Your car uses a Cable actuated clutch. The tranny is meant to go in a car with a hydraulic actuated clutch. There are kits available to use the hydro trannies in cable cars. Hasport now makes a mount kit with hydro-cable conversion pieces and the special hydro tranny mount. Check out their site https://www.hasport.com .

The other path is to sell the hydro tranny (which go for quite a bit more than cable trannies) and buy a B16 cable tranny. Expect to pay around $300 for a non LSD one and about $600 if you can find an LSD one.

ODB2 USDM B18C5​


Engine: 1997-up USDM B18C5
Displacement: 1797cc
Compression Ratio: 10.6:1
Rod/stroke ratio: 1.58
Hp/Torque: 195hp@8000rpm/130lb-ft@7500rpm
Transmission: S80 w/ LSD (hydraulic)
OBD: 2
ECU: P73

Out of 97+ Integra Type Rs this motor is Honda's best 1.8 liter. It features larger cams/better valve train than the B18C1, factory polished PR3 Head (different than the B18C1's P72), short/fat single runner intake manifold, 14lb flywheel (4 lbs lighter than all the other B-series motors), and a very short geared LSD tranny. These swaps typically run $4300-$4700 depending on where you get it.

The OBD problem:

This motor is OBD2. All of the wiring is different. You can convert the motor to obd0 by installing a 1g b16 distributor (OBD0 B18a dist will work with modification), getting an OBD0 VTEC ECU, and getting a whole bunch of OBD0 sensors (or putting OBD2 plugs on your OBD0 harness). You can utilize the OBD 2 injectors if you don't use an injector resistor box. These injectors are no bigger than normal b-series injectors.

You're probably not going to want to convert the car to OBD2. If you really want to convert the car to a different OBD, go to OBD1. Then you will still have to convert the motor to OBD 1 but that's not as hard as going from OBD1 - 0 or OBD 2 - 0. This motor does, however, run very well on its native OBD2.

The transmission problem:

Your car uses a Cable actuated clutch. The tranny is meant to go in a car with a hydraulic actuated clutch. However, there are kits available to use the hydro trannies in cable cars. Hasport now makes a mount kit with hydro-cable conversion pieces and the special hydro tranny mount (get it; ITR trannies are the best stock b-series tranny). Check out their site www.hasport.com .

The other path is to sell the hydro tranny (ITR trannies go for a LOT) and buy a B16 cable tranny. Expect to pay around $300 for a non LSD one and about $600 if you can find an LSD one (get an LSD one at the very least).

ODD2 JDM B18C​


Engine: 1995-up JDM B18C-R
Displacement: 1797cc
Compression Ratio: 11.0:1
Rod/stroke ratio: 1.58
Hp/Torque: 200hp@8000rpm/135lb-ft@7500rpm
Transmission: S80 w/ LSD (hydraulic)
OBD: 2
ECU: P73

This motor is the same as the USDM B18C5 but with higher compression. See above.

Poorman's TypeR​


Engine: Poorman's Type R (B18C block, b16a head)
Displacement: 1797cc
Compression Ratio: varies
Rod/stroke ratio: 1.58
Hp/Torque: varies
Transmission: choose
OBD: varies
ECU: varies

This motor is a B18C1 block (94+ GSR) with a b16 head. Some people buy B16 swaps, drive them for a while then swap the B16 block out for a B18C1 one. This is a pretty good alternative to the B18C in EFs because you can get an LSD equipped B16 for $1400 then a B18c block for around $700-$1k and then you already have all the OBD0 stuff. Also, this motor gives you the ability to build/rebuild the block slowly while still driving your swapped car. Unfortunately B18C short blocks are hard to find and go quick when you do find them.

It is recommended to get some higher compression pistons and a better valve train/cams. Might as well, right?

LS/VTEC and CR/VTEC (AKA B20VTEC)​


Engine: LS/VTEC CR/VTEC
Displacement: 1834cc - 1973cc and up
Compression Ratio: varies
Rod/stroke ratio: 1.54 (this stays the same)
Hp/Torque: varies
Transmission: varies
OBD: varies
ECU: varies

In these you essentially take a non-vtec block like the b18a/b or the b20b/z and put a VTEC head on. The idea is to take the low end torque of the non-vtec motors and combine it with the high rpm power of the VTEC motors. People do it and succeed in making a lot of power but a lot of people do it and just end up with a blown motor. These motors range from "stock" LS/VTECs where someone slaps a stock head on a stock non-vtec block (this is dumb), to fully built monsters.

The main reason a lot of people don't like them (me included) is because of the low rod/stroke ratios inherent in the non-vtec blocks. This low r/s ratio stresses the bottom end a bunch. If you'll notice, Honda reduced the stroke from the B18A/B to the B18C. Now if the B18C is supposed to be a more performance oriented motor why didn't they keep the displacement? For the better r/s ratio.

Another reason is that the non-vtec blocks don't come with some of the features that the VTEC blocks. These include oil squirters, block girdles (on the B18C's), and a very balanced bottom end.

The upside to this is that they have the potential to make a large amount of power. The build can be done mild to wild as you see fit. View our LS-VTEC/CR- VTEC Info and How to build a "reliable" lsvtec/b20vtec articles for more information.

B-Series NON-VTEC Engines​


OBD0 USDM B18A​


Engine: 1990-1991 USDM B18A1
Displacement: 1834cc
Compression Ratio: 9.2:1
Rod/stroke ratio: 1.54
Hp/Torque: 130hp@6000rpm/121lb-ft@5000rpm
Transmission: S1, Y1, YS1, A1 (91 only) (cable)
OBD: 0
ECU: PR4

The B18A1 is out of 90-91 integras. This is one of the easiest swaps out there especially if you have an Si, Hf, or an EX. If you don't, then you need to wire for multi-point. That's it.

These motors are readily available as well. People often swap motors into their 90-91 integras so they have these pretty-much-complete swaps just laying around. You cant find them at engine importers but quite a few people sell them on www.g2ic.com and you could probably find a few at junkyards. I picked up a whole swap minus wiring harness and axles for $500. Cant beat that with a stick, eh? The downside to this is mileage on the motors and the fact that some people swap motors in their integras because the stock B18A is going out the door.

Performance is good. I had a B18a in my civic for a few months and it was a good motor. Great for daily driving and just enough torque for the tight autocrosses we occasionally have. I took it to the drag strip once and netted a 15.1 @ 91mph in two runs at 2240ft above sea level.

OBD1 USDM B18A​


Engine: 1992-1993 USDM B18A1
Displacement: 1834cc
Compression Ratio: 9.2:1
Rod/stroke ratio: 1.54
Hp/Torque: 140hp@6300rpm/121lb-ft@5200rpm
Transmission: USDM YS1 (cable)
OBD: 1
ECU: OBD1 PR4

This B18A1 is out of 92-93 non-GSR integras. It is the same motor as the 90-91 B18A but with slightly larger cams and a (supposedly) better flowing intake manifold. These usually go for a few bucks more than the 90-91 motors.

This motor is OBD1 so you will have to either rewire your car or convert the motor to OBD0. I would suggest converting the motor. Its pretty cheap and very easy to do. You will need a 90-91 B18a distributor and ECU. For the injectors you have to wire them without an injector resistor box. And the only plug from the OBD1 harness you cant use with ease is going to be the distributor plug. So you will need to find one and may have to buy an entire engine harness (I get them for $35 at the junkyard, not a big deal). Or you could use the OBD1/2 plugs and put them on your OBD0 dist. That's all. Cake.

OBD1 or OBD2 USDM B18B​


Engine: 1994-Up USDM B18B1
Displacement: 1834cc
Compression Ratio: 9.2:1
Rod/stroke ratio: 1.54
Hp/Torque: 142hp@6300rpm/127lb-ft@5200rpm
Transmission: USDM S80 (hydraulic, long gears)
OBD: 1 or 2
ECU: P75

The B18B1 comes from 94+ non-GSR integras. This motor differs from the 92-93 motor in that it has a different head casting (P75 as opposed to PR4), ever so slightly larger cams, a (again, supposedly) better flowing intake manifold, and a little more aggressive ECU tuning. The motors are also obviously newer than any of the other non-VTEC B18s and are most likely in better shape.

For 94-95 this motor was OBD1 and for 96+ it was OBD2. Either way it is easy to convert them to OBD0 by getting a 90-91 B18a distributor and ECU. For the injectors you have to wire them without an injector resistor box. And the only plug from the OBD1 harness you cant use with ease is going to be the distributor plug. So you will need to find one and may have to buy an entire engine harness (I get them for $35 at the junkyard, not a big deal). Or you could use the OBD1/2 plugs and put them on your OBD0 dist. Its up to you.

OBD2 USDM B20B​


Engine: 1996-1998 USDM B20B
Displacement: 1973cc
Compression Ratio: 8.8:1
Rod/stroke ratio: 1.54
Hp/Torque: 126hp@5400rpm/133lb-ft@4300rpm
Transmission: ?
OBD: 2
ECU: Don't know/care. You wont use it.

Do not confuse the old Prelude B20A with the B20B. They are completely different.

These are from 97-98 CRV's. Don't be fooled by the low hp/tq rating, these motors came with the crappiest intake manifolds and exhaust manifolds known to man. If you do this swap you wont use either as the intake manifold wont fit in your car (its called the giraffe for a reason) and you will get a different header (even a stock integra manifold is WAY better). The USDM B20B is essentially a B18B1 with 84mm sleeves/pistons. Everything else is the same: head, cams, crank, rods, etc. So you can think of it as a bored, low compression B18a/b.

For this motor you will want to get just a long block because the tranny, wiring, ECU, and even the intake and exhaust manifolds are not needed (some long blocks may come with them, though). Because of this it is wise to get a whole B18A swap and sell the B18. That way you wont have to search around for a whole bunch of parts that you didn't anticipate needing. Trust me.

Intake manifold: You can use them from any non-vtec B18, a B20Z, or you can buy a skunk2 mani. I would suggest a B18B or skunk2 one. The skunk2 IM because it is supposedly the "mod to get" for the B20s, and the B18B IM because it is the best flowing of the B18 bunch. If you get a B18 or B20 IM then try and get it complete (fuel rail, injectors, TB and the like). I will cover the B20Z IM in the B20Z section.

Exhaust manifold: Get a header. If you want to be cheap you can use a stock integra one.

Tranny: Any B-series cable tranny will work. If you really want to use a hydro tranny or have one laying around get Hasport's mount kit for hydro trannies.

Wiring: You will have to convert the motor to OBD0. You do this by getting a 90-91 B18a distributor and ECU and putting them in your car. For the injectors you have to wire them without an injector resistor box. And the only plug from the OBD1 harness you cant use with ease is going to be the distributor plug. So you will need to find one and may have to buy an entire engine harness (I get them for $35 at the junkyard, not a big deal). Or you could use the OBD1/2 plugs and put them on your OBD0 dist. Its up to you.

OBD2 USDM B20Z​


Engine: 1999-2000 USDM B20Z
Displacement: 1973cc
Compression Ratio: 9.6:1
Rod/stroke ratio: 1.54
Hp/Torque: 146hp@6200rpm/133lb-ft@4500rpm
Transmission: ?
OBD: 2
ECU: Don't know/care. You wont use it.

This is the high compression version of the USDM B20B. It came out of 99-00 CRV's and is the king of all the non-vtec B-series motors. It comes with an intake cam that is .3mm larger in lift, a shorter/better intake manifold, and of course higher compression.

For this motor you will want to get just a long block because the tranny, wiring, ECU, and exhaust manifold is not needed. Because of this it is wise to get a whole B18A swap and sell the B18. That way you wont have to search around for a whole bunch of parts that you didn't anticipate needing. Trust me.

Intake manifold: With this motor you can use the stock one. But you cannot use the chamber on top because it doesn't clear the hood (I've tried it). Without that chamber there is a big gaping hole in the top of the IM and you, quite obviously, don't want that. What I did was make a plug out of UHMW plastic on the lathe to the same size as the chamber inlet and then put the chamber inlet rubber seal on my plug. It works well and I haven't had any vacuum leaks.

If you want to use the B20z throttle body (its 60mm as opposed to the 90-93 TB which is 58mm) then you either have to use the stock throttle cable bracket and mounting position (its straight up and down, it sucks). The better alternative (IMO) is to make a bracket that bolts onto the unused threaded holes that look to be in the same location as the throttle cable bracket on B18 IM's. The holes aren't in the same position and that is why you need to make a bracket. My bracket is out of 1" steel. It bolts to those holes and a stock B18 bracket bolts to my bracket. If you go this route you will need to use a throttle plate pulley (the throttle cable pulls on this to open the throttle) from a 90-93 integra.

If you want to use the stock CRV injectors you can. But I didn't know the size of them and they were significantly physically smaller than my B18 injectors, so I used the B18 ones. These are taller than the B20 injectors. To make them fit I put one B18A (d16a6 ones will work too) fuel rail spacer under each of the 3 fuel rail studs on the B20 mani (between the stud and the IM, they do not fit between the rail and the stud). I had to put a drill through the all of the spacer's holes so they would fit over the stud's threads.

If you insist on not using the stock IM you can use one from any non-vtec B18 or you can buy a skunk2 mani. If you are going to use a B18 one and you don't already have one, get the B18B IM because it is the best flowing of the b18 bunch. If you get a B18 IM try and get it complete (fuel rail, injectors, TB and the like).

Exhaust manifold: Get a header. If you want to be cheap you can use a stock integra one.

Tranny: Any B-series cable tranny will work. If you really want to use a hydro tranny or have one laying around get hasport's mount kit for hydro trannies.

Wiring: You will have to convert the motor to OBD0. You do this by getting a 90-91 B18a distributor and ECU and putting them in your car. For the injectors you have to wire them without an injector resistor box. And the only plug from the OBD1 harness you cant use with ease is going to be the distributor plug. So you will need to find one and may have to buy an entire engine harness (I get them for $35 at the junkyard, not a big deal). Or you could use the OBD1/2 plugs and put them on your OBD0 dist. Its up to you.

A comparison of the B20B vs, the B20Z with dyno charts exists and is at http://hybrid2.honda-perf.org/tech/b20/b20dyno2.html (broken link)
Quoted here for preservation:
B20Z vs. B20B

We did the best we could to compare the two engines. The intake manifold, intake, exhaust system, ecu and dyno facility are all the same. Only differences are the engine and the day tested. These runs are with the new cat.

b20bvsb20z.gif

The gains are impressive. 10 hp and 9 ft-lbs starting from 4500 rpm. I expected more of a gain through the low rpm band, due to the increase in compression from the 8.8 CR B20B, to the 9.6 CR of the B20Z. But the butt-dyno agrees that the gains are all in the upper range. I was actually worried that the Z had lost torque because the difference in power between the upper rpm range and lower rpm range was so large.
The B20Z feels great. It really pulls hard from 4000 up. 1st gear is good till 7k. With 2nd I shift at 6.5k if I plan to run 3rd gear hard, or I run it to 7k, if that's about all the speed I need. As you can see, the torque REALLY falls off at the top. At 6.7K the torque is the less than at 2k!! You can feel it, and you quickly learn to shift early.

98 B20Z stock head and block, 94 P75/LS ecu
Intake: GSR stock cone filter and tube (no airbox), LS intake manifold, 64mm TB
JDM 4-1 header, test pipe, Greddy BL exhaust
138hp @ 5700 and 132 ft-lbs @ 5200 to the wheels. (Versus factory specs of 146 hp @ 6200 and 133 @ 4500 to the flywheel)

I have this motor in my car now and it rules. It is happy going fast anywhere above 3k and putts around town with no problem at 1500-3k. It also kicks major ass at auto-x events. The power is great, even for the long auto-x events we often have on the road course (80+ mph straights). I went to the drag strip and pulled a 14.42@95 on my first of 3 runs at 2240ft on a 100deg F day. I must say that this motor is WAY more fun than the B18A ever was. Oh yeah, and I'm getting 34 miles to the gallon on a chipped ECU when I drive sane.

OBD2 JDM B20B​


Engine: 1996-2000 JDM B20B
Displacement: 1973cc
Compression Ratio: 8.8:1, 9.2:1, 9.6:1
Rod/stroke ratio: 1.54
Hp/Torque: up to146hp@6200rpm/133lb-ft@4500rpm
Transmission: ?
OBD: 2
ECU: Don't know/care. You wont use it.

These motors are a mixed bag. Who knows what you're going to get when you buy your long block from an importer. There is no real concrete information available that accurately maps out which motor came from which years/cars. So I will attempt you tell you and at the very least tell you how to identify your motor (hopefully without taking the head off).

In general the 95 - 98 motors are the 8.8:1 compression motors and are exactly like the USDM B20B. They have the tall intake manifold and no knock sensor on the back of the block. If there is no knock sensor then you have an 8.8:1 compression motor. If you want to take off the head you will find the letters P3F on the top of the slightly dished piston.

Most of the 99-2000 motors are of the 9.6:1 compression variety and are just like the USDM B20Z. These motors have the short intake manifold with the chamber on top and a knock sensor. If you have a knock sensor on the back of the block, the motor is most likely has 9.6:1 compression. The pistons are almost flat and have a PHK designation.

I have read that the 9.2:1 motors exist but I have seen no proof. I don't know what they are out of or what the identifying marks are. My guess is that if you get one it will be mistaken for a 9.6:1 motor. If you have any info on this please let me know.

If you got a motor with the tall manifold see the USDM B20B section. If yours came with a short manifold see the USDM B20Z section.

Expect to pay $700-$800 for a long block.

OBD0 USDM B20A / B21A​


Engine: Up to 1991 USDM B20A/B21A
Displacement: 1958cc or 2056cc
Compression Ratio: 9.0:1 or 9.4:1
Rod/stroke ratio: lower than 1.54
Hp/Torque: 104hp@5800rpm/111lb-ft@4000rpm to140hp@5800rpm/135lb-ft@5000rpm
Transmission: ?
OBD: 0
ECU: Don't know/care.

These came from 88-91 preludes (maybe others too). These engines are not worth swapping into your civic. Don't be fooled by the price of them. They are regarded as the worst of all the Honda engines and aren't even included in b20 discussions. They get their displacement increase by a very long stroke (95mm as opposed to the B18A's already long 89mm). This means that they have to use short rods. That means a low rod/stroke ratio which puts a lot of stress on the bottom end components (cyl walls, rods, etc.).

D-Series Engines​


OBD0 USDM D16A6​


Engine: 1988 to 1991 USDM D16A6
Displacement: 1590cc
Compression Ratio: 9.1:1
Rod/stroke ratio: 1.52
Hp/Torque: 108hp@6000rpm/100lb-ft@5000rpm
Transmission: Si L3
OBD: 0
ECU: PM6 (PS9 if auto EX)

This engine came in 88-91 CRX Si's, 89-91 Civic Si's, and 90-91 Civic EX's. So if you are swapping this motor then you probably have a Dual-Point motor in there now. This swap is the easiest of all motor swaps into the EF chassis. Pull old motor out, wire for multi-point and slide the new motor in. Easy. The only extra part you need is a 90-93 integra or CRX/Civic Si throttle cable.

These motors can be had for very cheap. A buddy of mine picked one up for $75 with 108K miles on it. We put it in an 88 four door DX and it ran high 15's.

OBD0 USDM D16A1​


Engine: 1986 to 1989 USDM D16A1/3
Displacement: 1590cc
Compression Ratio: 9.3:1 or 9.5:1
Rod/stroke ratio: 1.52
Hp/Torque: up to 118hp@6800rpm/103lb-ft@5700rpm
Transmission: ?
OBD: 0
ECU: PG6

These motors are out of 86-89 integras. They don't fit in the EF chassis without mounts and no one makes mounts for them. I have also read that the tranny doesn't bolt up to any other D-Series motors. Also the DOHC head does not fit on any of the other SOHC blocks. So don't get one of these for your EF.

OBD0 JDM "ZC"​


Engine: Up to 1991 ZC
Displacement: 1590cc
Compression Ratio: 9.3:1 or 9.5:1
Rod/stroke ratio: 1.52
Hp/Torque: up to 129hp@6800rpm/108lb-ft@5700rpm
Transmission: ?
OBD: 0
ECU: PM7

These motors came from a whole bunch of different cars in Japan (3g civics/crxs, 4g civics/crxs, 5g civics, and 1 and 2g integras). They came in a few different variations: carbed & pgmfi, SOHC and DOHC. They also came in a few cars in Europe but the motor was called the D16A8/9 and came with a PM2 ECU. Here is a site for identifying the ZC: http://www.geocities.com/teampimports/zcfiles/wzc.htm {dead link, quoted below:}

Forms Of The ZC:​


sohc twin-carbureted​
16v sohc, dual keihin carbs (sideways)
power - 105ps
da-series honda integra rx and zx
dc-series honda integra zx
eg series honda ferio rtx (eh1) with all wheel drive

sohc pgm-fi​
16v sohc, programmed fuel injection
power - 120ps
ef-series honda civic 36i
da-series honda integra rxi and zxi
db/dc series honda integra zxi
revised db/dc series honda integra ti, xi-g, xi(4x4)

sohc vtec pgm-fi​
16v sohc with vtec, programmed fuel injection
power - 130ps
eg-series honda civic ferio exi (e-ej3)

dohc pgm-fi​
16v dohc, programmed fuel injection
power - 125ps
1st gen civic si
e-as crx si (1st gen)
honda integra gsi, rsi

dohc pgm-fi​
16v dohc, programmed fuel injection
power - 130
ef-series honda civic si (ef3)
ef-series honda crx si (ef7)
eg-series honda civic fero rtsi(4x4)


The zc also appeared in the concerto lineup in sohc carbed and sohc pgm-fi. A dohc zc with twin carbs also was made in south Africa for the ef7 series

To tell if it is a Zc:​
The d16a has the same capacity, bore and stoke as zc motor. However it is cast in the USA. 89-teg motor looks the same as the zc but it is not worth the effort to bolt up

Identification marks:

The engine code will either state zc if it is a Japanese model or d16a8 if it is European model.

The second gen dohc zc will have a black valve cover with the bolts on the sides, and the Honda h at the exhaust side of the cover. There is a oil to water cooler on the back of the block. Motor mounts are identical to an 88-91 civic or crx's.

Anything different Do not by for an 88-91 civic.

Here is the main part I wanted you to read:

The engine code will either state zc if it is a Japanese model or d16a8 if it is European model.

The second gen dohc zc will have a black valve cover with the bolts on the sides, and the Honda h at the exhaust side of the cover. There is a oil to water cooler on the back of the block. Motor mounts are identical to an 88-91 civic or crx's.

If you get the right one, these motors bolt in with no problems at all. The swap is just like the D16A6 swap. You need a 90-93 integra or CRX/Civic Si throttle cable, then you need to wire for multi-point. That's all. These motors can be run with a variety of ECU's including (but probably not limited to) the PG7, PM7, PM6, PM2 (I've never ever seen one, not even on the internet), and PR4 (OBD0). Expect to pay around $500 for a ZC long block (about the same as a 1g B16A long block, crazy eh?).

See also: https://hondaswap.com/threads/zc-swap-info.29123/

OBD0 JDM "ZC"​


Engine: 1992 to 1995 USDM D16Z6
Displacement: 1590cc
Compression Ratio: 9.2:1
Rod/stroke ratio: 1.52
Hp/Torque: up to 125hp@6600rpm/106lb-ft@5200rpm
Transmission: Something Hydraulic
OBD: 1
ECU: P28

The SOHC VTEC D16Z6 came from 92-95 civic Si's and EX's. This is a fairly common swap because Z6's can be had for fairly cheap. I have seen them go for as little as $200 and as much as $500 (tranny may or may not be included, but you don't need it anyway). The only problems are with the hydro tranny (if you get it) and the OBD1.

The hydro tranny isn't of much use to us 4g swap folks because it is a large pain to make work. The best solution is to find an EF Si tranny and be done with it. Any D-series tranny will work, like say the ever so common DX tranny (wanna buy one? I have 3), but the Si tranny has a lower final drive (same gears) than the DX one. Shorter gears are your friend. Just stay away from the 4 speed at all costs.

As far as the OBD goes you have 2 options. You can make it easy on yourself and stay OBD0 or you can convert the car to OBD1. If you stay OBD0 its going to be a little ghetto and there is no way around it. Going OBD1 at least has the potential to not be ghetto but some people still make it ghetto. Either way, take your time.

For OBD0 you first off need a D16A6 distributor. No, you cant use your D15B2 dual-point one. The A6 dist fits on the head but you can only secure it with 2 of the 3 bolts. One lines right up and the other two don't but fortunately one of those two is close enough to use. I suppose you could cut the mounting ears off and weld them on in the right location but that is a lot of work and I haven't seen it done yet. Then you need a way to make VTEC work. There are a variety of ways to do this. MSD makes an RPM activated switch you can use (shift lights also contain one of these and I have seen people use them), you can get a VAFC, you can run a PR3 or PW0 ECU (have to add another o2 sensor or get the ECU chipped to remove BOTH o2 sensors), or you can find a PS9 ECU and get it chipped with a 1 wire vtec program (one of the best ways IMO). Here is a link to a Z6 swap writeup: http://www.geocities.com/chacofgs/swap.html {broken link, quoted below}
D16Z6 SOHC VTEC into 90 Civic STD Swap Info​
I am going to try to explain the steps i follow in order to swap the D16Z6 into my 1990 Civic STD. This applies to any 88-91 Civic (4G) or CRX. This procedures worked for me. Use this as reference on your own risk. If you don't know what i mean by STD , its the Standard version of the 88-91 Civic HB that its not either a DX or Si. A way to identify it is because it comes with a 4 speed tranny. I got most of my info from the web, good sites like www.hybrid-k.com (in the archives) and Hasport and some others which i cant remember bc they are a lot. Use www.google.com search engine, it will give u some good places full of info.

I bought my engine from one of my friends who just did a B16A2 swap into his 93 EX civic. I got the engine for 130. I managed to get the engine tuned up and clean while i had it out, I then did a compression test and i found that the #2 cyl had only 125 psi . I knew something was wrong, either bad valve seats, broken valves, piston rings, or cracks, or something. So i decided to rebuild the engine at that point and then swap it in. Then i slowly started getting the engine apart and rebuilding it on my backyard. Make sure everything its ok. Check for everything. its good to check the timing belt, water pump, cracks, valve, gaskets, seals, etc. Its easier to work on it while u still have it out.

Before u start ur swap u need to figure out what parts u need, and what route u going towards. If u got a Si u can use your stock ECU and Dizzy .IF u have a DX or STD u need to convert it to MPFI as in the SI. After that its taken care off, u then choose if u wanna stay OBDO or wanna go OBDI. If u choose to go OBDI, theres a few places to get it. Going OBDI its going to require a lot of rewire, besides the conversion of the existing wires u need to add a VTEC, VTEC press switch, Knock sensor, and oil temp. All this hassle if done right will pay off better on the performance of the car. Odds are that something its going to go wrong. try to keep it simple. Zdyne (www.zdyne.com) offers a one wire conversion which its in my opinion a great and easy way to have that engine running. If u using a STD or DX u need a Si dizzy, ECU, Injectors, and injectors resistor. Don't use your 92-00 injectors because they will fry. I fried 2 injectors off the 93 Si. The 4G injectors are 1.5-3.5 ohms, while others are 10-13 ohms.. they work but they will not last more than 2 weeks. I used the 5G intake manifold, its bigger and has al the same sensors as the 4G one.

Once I finished rebuilding it, then i decided to get my parts together and go and swap it. Since i didn't want to have any performance shop do it, i had a friend who works on a shop, and we took a day just for my swap

The first thing we did was drain all the fluids. Then we manage to start unplugging everything and removing my old nasty D15B1 engine. Once i got everything out, the next step was to clean the engine bay a little. Then the next step its to transfer the Driver side engine mount from the old D15B1 into the D16Z6. Not the bushing, the part of the mount that its on the engine block. At this time transfer the alternator, the engine harness from the B1 to the Z6,(some plugs might not work, they are like 3 of them) and get ready to put that baby back in the engine bay. The mounts needed on this engine are the same ones u had on the old engine. Since both engines are D series, they mount as a direct bolt on.

Since my budget was tight as the moment i used my old D15B1 4 speed tranny until i can get a hold of an 4G Si tranny. When u put the tranny on the engine to mount it in, use the 5G clutch since it has a bigger clutch , and holds a few more hundred more psi than the B1. Note: If u have an 88 CRX or Civic , note that the clutch that year has a spindle that contains one extra tooth on the tranny shaft, u got to use the Stock 88 clutch if u using the 88 tranny. Time to start getting the Z6 into the engine. Removing the radiator its going to be easier and u might prevent from braking it while u installing the new engine. After the engine its installed, its fun time. Time to start the wiring. The first mod on the wiring its to convert the Dual Point Fuel Injection (DPFI) system to Multi Point Fuel Injection (MPFI). First u need an injector resistor. Any honda Resistor works since they are all 6 ohms. I am not going to list all the details since they are a little long. If u want the info email me or go to hybrid honda and find the DX to ZC wiring conversion. to make that conversion quick and easy here, go as follows. U will need 4 injector plugs, the resistor box, the 4 injectors, wire and shrink wrap. Injector resistor has 5 cables, 4 same color and 1 different(colors may vary depending what car it came off. The A3 pin off the ecu goes to injector #2(red wire), the A7 ecu pin goes to injector #4 (yellow wire), the ecu pin A1 goes to injector #1 (brown), and the ecu Pin A5 goes to injector #3(light blue). Then install both yellow/black cables off the engine harness to the 1 lonely color cable on the resistor. Then each of the 4 cables (of the same color)of the resistor to each injector. After getting the resistor box, the injectors, and all the plugs installed on the Intake manifold its time to play with the Distributor wiring. Again i got all the info on the wiring, to make things simple, the 7 cables on the distributor go as follows.

orange goes to B10
white goes to B12
orange/blue goes to C3
white/blue goes to C4
blue/ green goes to C1
blue yellow goes to C2

This is the hardest part of wiring of the whole swap. Just wiring the 4G Si dizzy into the harness and converting the DPFI to MPFI. If u got the CRX HF or civic Si u can skip the wiring. Just concentrate on making the Distributor fit. I used the 89 CRX distributor. I had to modify 2 of the legs of the distributor in order for it to fit the engine. Just 2 legs are able to hold down the dizzy. I used a 88 CRX Si ECU (PM6) . Any PM6 computer will work , but it will be better to have a 88-89 Integra ECU (PG7) which has a higher redline and better fuel map.

Nest its to figure out how to make VTEC kick. Disregard this if u get a ZDyne 1 Wire ECu. I really recommend these. I wish i had the money for one of those. All depends on ur budget, u can use an APEXI v-afc, the Fields VTEC controller, MSD RPM Activated switch, toggle switch , anyways, there's tons of ways. Since my budget was tight i decided to go MSD switch. The MSD RPM switch part number its PN 8950 and i used the modules kit PN 8744. I have the Switch set to kick VTEC @ 4600. The first cam lobe gives power up to around 4600, after that it looses power, so i decided to have VTEC kicking in right when the lobe isn't doing any more power. Follow the MSD instructions to install the switch, except that u need to use a car relay with that since the switch provides GND and VTEC needs a 12V+ signal. U use all the cables except the gray one of the switch. If u get the relay i am going to give the pin outs since the relays are not too explained.

Relay (5 pin or 4 pin one)
87 goes to VTEC solenoid
86 goes to the red on MSD switch
85 goes to yellow on MSD switch
30 goes to a 12V+


Now that u have everything set and done its time to test ur new Hybrid. I do feel VTEC kicking in, and i do hear the sound changing once VTEC kicks. This its kinda good since normally u never hear or feel any difference on the 5G and 6G civic EX's and Si's SOHC VTEC engines. I am very happy with the results. The engine pills nice and runs smooth. In my opinion it was worth it to do the swap. Specially makes me feel very proud and i feel it was well worth it compared to the old B1 and others 4G Si's around i have drove.

Remember i used a weird setup for my car, but there are many ways of swapping this engine on a 4G. U can convert from OBDO to OBDI and run the engine with the stock P28 computer, or u can use a Zdyne 1 wire ECU, u can use a 88-89 Integra ECU, ETC .. Everything depends on ur budget and whos going to do it. Hope i helped. Enjoy ur new VTEC 4G Civic or CRX!


If you go for the gusto and decide to convert everything to OBD1 then you will need to get a P28 ECU and then do a bunch of wiring. Scroll up to read the quoted text from kurtsi_on regarding the OBD0 to 1 conversion..

OBD2 USDM D16Y8​


Engine: 1996 to 2000 USDM D16Y8
Displacement: 1590cc
Compression Ratio: 9.6:1
Rod/stroke ratio: 1.52
Hp/Torque: 127hp@6600rpm/107lb-ft@5500rpm
Transmission: Something Hydraulic
OBD: 2
ECU: P2P

This motor comes out of 96-2000 civic EXs. The block is essentially the same as the a6 and z6 blocks, but the head is a lot different. It has been said that the z6 head flows better than the y8 head at high rpm. This is due to the port shapes and sizes. There have been many threads on many message boards debating which one is better. Also the y8 manifold has shorter, fatter runners and a larger plenum than any of the other d-series manifolds. It has been called the "ITR manifold for the D-series."

If you are not going for all out power then the head difference doesn't really matter. This motor has higher compression and a slightly larger cam than the Z6 and so even though the Z6 head is "better," stock for stock they are about the same as far as moving your car. The Y8 head does have 1 advantage over the Z6 head for us EF OBD0 d00ds. The A6 distributor bolts right up with no modification so there is less hacking with this swap than with the z6. Other than the A6 dist you will need a way to activate VTEC which can be done a few different ways. MSD makes an RPM activated switch you can use (shift lights also contain one of these and I have seen people use them), you can get a VAFC, you can run a PR3 or PW0 ECU (have to add another o2 sensor or get the ECU chipped to remove BOTH o2 sensors), or you can find a PS9 ECU and get it chipped with a 1 wire vtec program (one of the best ways IMO).

If you want to go OBD1 follow the link in the Z6 section. I have read that there are a few OBD1 distributors that bolt onto the y8 head (like the CX one) so that shouldn't really be a problem.

Then you need to get a D series cable tranny. The hydro tranny isn't of much use to us EF swap folks because it is a pain to make work. The best solution is to find an EF Si tranny and be done with it. Any D-series tranny will work, like say the ever so common DX tranny (wanna buy one? I have 3), but the Si tranny has a lower final drive (same gears) than the DX one. Shorter gears are your friend. Just stay away from the 4 speed at all costs.

MiniMe​

Engine: mini-me (non-vtec block, sohc vtec head, usually D-series)

Displacement: ~1493 - ~1590cc
Compression Ratio: ?
Rod/stroke ratio: 1.52 or 1.59
Hp/Torque: ?
Transmission: ?
OBD: probably 0
ECU: ?

This motor is the "LS/VTEC" for the D family. You take a D15 or D16 block and put a Z6 or Y8 head on there. There is, however, a whole lot less risk in building these than there is with the LS/VTECs because of the price and because most of the d16s (the ones you would use) come with essentially the same block (and therefore the same or even HIGHER rod/stroke ratio). If you use a d16 you will end up with a r/s ratio of 1.52 if you use the D15 block you end up with a r/s ratio of 1.59.

The usual, normal guy, good running mini-me consists of:

D16 or D15 block
Z6 head
Y8 intake manifold
B18A throttle body (2mm bigger than the Z6 and Y8 manis and 3mm larger than the A6 one)
PM6 and RPM switch (PS9 1 wire vtec is made for the D vtec swaps and is so much better than any rpm switch)

Compression Ratio info (not calculated by me):
d16a6 block, d16z6 head: 10.4:1 (Head has 34.6cc combustion chamber volume)
d16a6 block, d16y8 head: 11.2:1 (Head has 32.8cc combustion chamber volume)
d15b2 block, d16z6 head: 10.6:1 (Head has 34.6cc combustion chamber volume)

Here are some mini-me links:


So there you have it. I have included all of the popular engine swap choices and hopefully this helps someone.

If you find anything wrong with this let me know. If you want to add to it, let me know.

Ben
 
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